en:bitcoin [Hacker Wars]

Bitcoin - The Currency of the Internet

A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. A large percentage of Bitcoin enthusiasts are libertarians, though people of all political philosophies are welcome.
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Bitcoin Wiki

Development of reddit-based Bitcoin wiki
[link]

Bitcoin UK

A community dedicated to the discussion of Bitcoin based in the United Kingdom.
[link]

"More on payment channels [https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Payment\_channels](https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Payment_channels)Sounds like Lightning Network not a long chain of unconfirmed txs...."An unrecorded open transaction can keep..." [-10]

submitted by NegativeWithGoldBot to NegativeWithGold [link] [comments]

Do you agree with the following article: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/From_address

Its central contention is in the first sentence:
Bitcoin addresses are used to receive payments, but not to send them: there is no concept of a "from" address in Bitcoin.
submitted by jrm2007 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Kristov Atlas on Twitter- A few of the security vulns in the Satoshi-based over the years en.bitcoin.it/wiki/CVEs

Kristov Atlas on Twitter- A few of the security vulns in the Satoshi-based over the years en.bitcoin.it/wiki/CVEs submitted by increaseblocks to btc [link] [comments]

https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/How_to_import_private_keys

"users should never import (or export) private keys." WTF ? if you don't control your private keys, you don't own your bitcoin. I export my private keys and encrypt them and store them personally.
Edit1: to clarify, I track my change, and send it to other keys that i control. I don't leave change in addresses controlled by the wallet in keys not shown transparently by the qt-client. Also, the wiki page mentions nothing about the change issue... anyone with edit access ?
submitted by backprop to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why is en.bitcoin.it wiki always unreachable?

It shows up in google searches. But when I try to access, I always get an error message. Is site down or being blocked?
submitted by mvpratt to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

How to add you business to https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Merchant_Howto to the section business ?

If anyone could help me :) ?
submitted by dannycarrey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Kristov Atlas on Twitter- A few of the security vulns in the Satoshi-based over the years en.bitcoin.it/wiki/CVEs

Kristov Atlas on Twitter- A few of the security vulns in the Satoshi-based over the years en.bitcoin.it/wiki/CVEs submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

This is a proposal to modify the BitCoin... #CompuCoin #Bitcoin #Wiki https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/CompuCoin @compucoin

submitted by cpnuser to compucoin [link] [comments]

BTC is a Ponzi according to the bitcoin wiki on en.bitcoin.it

Is Bitcoin a Ponzi scheme?
In a Ponzi Scheme, the founders persuade investors that they’ll profit. Bitcoin does not make such a guarantee. There is no central entity, just individuals building an economy.
A ponzi scheme is a zero sum game. Early adopters can only profit at the expense of late adopters. Bitcoin has possible win-win outcomes. Early adopters profit from the rise in value. Late adopters, and indeed, society as a whole, benefit from the usefulness of a stable, fast, inexpensive, and widely accepted p2p currency.
My experience of BTC recently is not fast or inexpensive. 4 days ago I took advantage of the mempool dip to sweep my last BTC wallet (a brainwallet I had set up for my kids, which I've been reluctant to touch). I way over estimated the fee at 100 sats/byte, just to be sure it would be fast. Of course the mempool exploded again and I've now spent over 100 usd in additional miner bribes (in BCH of course) to get it to confirm, so that I can take advantage of the BCH/BTC dip.
This wiki was my first insight into buying bitcoin. I did a lot of research and found that it was completely factual and until 1st Aug 2017 it was a great resource. It is way past time they corrected it by adding a simple word: 'cash'. This would make it accurate again.
submitted by redditchampsys to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cant send from Localbitcoins to Electrum. ELI5 Bitcoin address inter-operability?

When I tried to send from Localbitcoins to Electrum it failed even though I thought Local had upgraded 2 years ago. I sent it elsewhere so didn't need to solve that issue. Why is it still not working?
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address explaining the address formats:
There are currently three address formats in use:
P2PKH which begin with the number 1, eg: 1BvBMSEYstWetqTFn5Au4m4GFg7xJaNVN2
P2SH type starting with the number 3, eg: 3J98t1WpEZ73CNmQviecrnyiWrnqRhWNLy
Bech32 type starting with bc1, eg: bc1qar0srrr7xfkvy5l643lydnw9re59gtzzwf5mdq
What kind of sending/receiving from which types of addresses will not work?
submitted by fap_fap_fap_fapper to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

[HALVING MEGATHREAD] Block 630000 has been mined. Mining subsidy is now 6.25 BTC per block. The third Bitcoin Halving is now complete!

As of now, 630,000 blocks have been mined on the Bitcoin network, and the block reward has successfully halved for the second THIRD time. The previous block reward was 12.5 BTC, and the new block reward is now 6.25 BTC. Since the previous halving at Block 420000, monetary inflation decreased from 4.17%% to 3.57%. Block 630000 signals an immediate 50% reduction to 1.79%. The next halving will occur at Block 840000 in approximately four years. Godspeed, Bitcoin!
Here's Block 630000 in all its glory!
{ "hash": "000000000000000000024bead8df69990852c202db0e0097c1a12ea637d7e96d", "confirmations": "1", "strippedsize": "1186930", "weight": "3993250", "height": "630000", "version": "536870912", "merkleroot": "b191f5f973b9040e81c4f75f99c7e43c92010ba8654718e3dd1a4800851d300d", "tx": "3134", "time": "1589225023", "nonce": "2302182970", "bits": "387021369", "difficulty": "16104807485529", "previousblockhash": "0000000000000000000d656be18bb095db1b23bd797266b0ac3ba720b1962b1e", } 
coinbase transaction: 6.25 BTC + 0.90968084 BTC in fees
block size: 1186.93 KB
transactions: 3134
total bitcoins: 18,375,000
remaining bitcoins: ~2,625,000
previous halving: 3 years 10 months 2 days 2 hours 37 minutes 30 seconds ago
[Monetary Inflation Chart] [Controlled Supply] [Bitcoin Clock]
[blockstream.info] [insight.io] [tradeblock.com] [mempool.space] [btc.com] [blockchain.com]
submitted by BashCo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Use weaker hash from strong hash to reduce size ?

Hello,
I was wondering if it would make sense to use a weaker hash algorithm (e.g. MD5 or SHA-1) on a hash generated by a stronger one (e.g. SHA-2, SHA-3) to reduce the storing size of the hash.Every keys will be hashed 2 times (e.g key -> SHA-2 -> MD5).
I was reading The bitcoin block size limit controversy (link) and was wondering if reducing the hash of Previous Block and Merkel Root could reduce the size of a block.
What are the consequences of doing that?

Edit: thank you for all your explanations!
submitted by LutinRose to crypto [link] [comments]

I've been sharing conspiracies on reddit longer than this sub has been around. I have a story to tell.

This story is mostly crafted from my own experiences, my conversations with some of the people involved, and the rest is my own guesswork as I try to fill in the gaps...so bear with me!
That's why I wanted to share with this community, which I've watched grow over the years. I remember posting about the death of Barry Jennings (who witnessed explosions in the WTC on 9/11) the day after it happened. This was before /conspiracy (or right around when it was formed), and I remember thinking "we really need a sub for conspiracies on reddit!"
And here we are, 12 years later and over 1.3 million subscribers...incredible!
So...
My story starts with a young man. We'll call him Andrew.
Andrew grew up in the 90's in a coastal US town and quickly blossomed into a tech whiz at a young age.
He began building his own computers, and after a brief stint using Windows, he decided that Bill Gates was everything wrong with technology (and the world), and he made it his mission to make sure folks like Gates were NOT the future of computers.
He really believed that the use of technology was a fundamental human right, and that charging people for "proprietary" OS's that hid their source code was a violation of these rights.
He saw a possible Deus Ex-like future, with a technocracy literally around the corner if we didn't act now.
Andrew soon joined the Free Software Foundation and began rubbing elbows with the likes of Richard Stallman. He begun exclusively using GNU/Linux and was the type to correct you if you called it just "Linux". He also began visiting tech-savvy forums like slashdot and started networking in earnest.
By 2006 (his senior year of high school) Andrew was completely over his "education" and decided to just drop out completely.
Shockingly, a college accepted him anyway. A small East Coast school had been actively courting Andrew, and when they learned he had failed to get his HS diploma, they accepted him anyway!
Now sometime during this period Andrew went to Iceland and stayed in Reykjavik for several months.
This trip may have happened during the summer, fall, or early winter of 2006. The reason for his trip had something to do with his efforts in the FSF or similar group. The possible significance of this trip will become clear as we go on.
What is clear is that Andrew started college in the fall of 2006, and that the circumstances were unusual. Andrew soon met several like-minded individuals and began building a social and technological network at his school.
Two individuals in particular would become key players in his life (one more prominently in this story, but the other was significant as well), and eventually the 3 would live together in town for several years.
But for now let's stick with Andrew.
Andrew had an idea to build a social network for his college. Except, it wasn't just a network, it was a wiki for information about the school...and beyond. Soon, it began to morph into something much bigger in Andrew's mind.
He saw his project as being one of many data "hubs" for leaks of important documents and otherwise sensitive information.
So yeah, he saw the opportunity for a wiki for leaks (see where this is going yet...?).
As his ambitions grew, his behavior started to become increasingly erratic. He was caught with drugs and arrested. Strangely, the charges were pretty much dropped and he was given a slap on the wrist. Eventually he decided to leave the school, but still lived in town and had access to the servers on campus.
By 2010 Andrew was still living in the small town with his two "hacker" buddies, who were still enrolled at the school.
This house was in some ways legendary. It appears that many "interesting" people spent time at or visited the residence. Indeed, some of the early movers and shakers of /conspiracy itself passed through.
There was usually a full NO2 tank for anyone who was into that kinda thing, and they were stocked with every hallucinogen and research chemical known to man.
It was also likely under surveillance by multiple intelligence agencies (NSA/Mossad/etc).
Over time, the mental state of Andrew was slowly starting to deteriorate, which wasn't helped by his abuse of drugs.
Still, Andrew decided to move his base of operations to Europe, spending time in Belgium, the Czech Republic and elsewhere.
One of his housemates was soon to join him on his adventures in Europe and elsewhere abroad. We'll call him "Aaron."
Aaron had a very similar story and upbringing as Andrew. Aaron was also from a coastal US town and was born into privilege. He was also, supposedly, born into a family with some serious connections to intelligence agencies, including an uncle with ties to the NSA, and both parents connected to military brass.
By 2015, Andrew and Aaron were living together in the Czech Republic. During this time they were working directly and/or indirectly for the NSA (via Cisco and other companies).
You see, the "college" they met at was actually a front for the recruitment of kids into the IC. Apparently, many "schools" in the US function that way. Go figure.
Their intelligence and valuable skill set (hacking etc) made them valuable assets. They were also possibly involved with the distribution of certain "research chemicals" (of the 2C* variety) to dignitaries and their entourages (in one example, they provided 2CB to a group with David Cameron).
In addition, Andrew was allegedly involved with, or stumbled upon, an NSA-linked surveillance project directed at the entire country of Malaysia, while Aaron was involved with Cisco.
Aaron himself had gotten into hot water for releasing damaging information about the NSA, and even claimed to be an NSA whistleblower, and was also possibly the individual who leaked the 2014 (or 2015) Bilderberg meeting list.
And then things went bad. Andrew quit the Malaysia project and Aaron left Cisco. It seems Andrew and Aaron were "set up" during a fiery false flag event in the Czech Republic in 2015. It may have happened at an embassy, but it's unclear which. There is no information on the web about anything like this (afaik).
Aaron was immediately targeted and spent several years on the run. Allegedly, he was added to the list of victims in the so-called "Great Game".
The Great Game is the term used for an international assassination program where intelligence agencies share a list of targets to be neutralized. The German BND and Mossad are heavily involved, as other networks. Individuals targeted by the Great Game may be offed by actual assassins, or by NPC-like humans whose minds will be influenced by mind control tech (a la Matrix...say influencing someone to ram your car unwittingly ie).
As Aaron went on the lam, Andrew soon returned to the US, shell-shocked by his experience.
Both Andrew and Aaron continue to suffer from some sort of PTSD from these series of events, rendering Andrew largely incapacitated and Aaron scattered and discombobulated.
The Meat of the Matter
OK...where does that leave us? Why am I sharing all of this? I think there's much more to this story.
So let's start speculating! Everything I'm about to say is stuff that was told to me personally. I can't vouch for any of this information, though obviously I thought it was compelling enough to share.
Here's the gist: The so-called whistleblowers you see in the media are almost all fake.
This includes: Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Thomas Drake and William Binney (hey look, his AMA is pinned on this sub right now...no comment!). These individuals, and others, are controlled opposition. The real whistleblowers are severely punished.
For example, Bradley Manning was punished with chemical castration in jail. His "transformation" was chemically induced torture.
Andrew was not alone in his passion. There were lots of other young visionaries like him who dreamed of a freer and more transparent world.
In this story, Julian Assange was an intelligence asset...a psyop meant to steal the thunder from real activists like Andrew.
In this story, a small college-based "wiki" for government leaks was used as the model for an intelligence operation known as "wikileaks".
In this story, Andrew traveled to Iceland at some point in 2006.
When was Wikileaks founded? Wikileaks was founded by Julian Assange in December 2006, in Iceland.
Aaron discovered (legally, like Manning who had clearance to access all the data he leaked) damning information about surveillance happening by the NSA, specifically against recruits entering the US army and elsewhere.
In this story, the "Andrew" identity was co-opted and turned into "Julian Assange", and "Aaron" became "Edward Snowden".
Granted, there were probably other people that these whistleblower imposters were modeled after, but Andrew and Aaron seem like very strong contenders for some of this inspiration.
Now, much of the following may be gobbledygook (lol I spelled that right first try!) for all I know, but since I'm having a really hard time making sense of it all, I'll just include everything I can and let you guys run with it.
Here are some phrases, ideas, terms and people of note that may be involved with this story...MODS: None of this is doxing! All of the links of people are wikipedia pages or published interviews/articles. So yeah. Not dox!
IN CONCLUSION
I don't know how these terms, theories and individuals fit into this story, but that they may be somehow related.
Hopefully there are enough bread crumbs in here to keep some of you busy!
Any help/insight would be appreciated. I confess I'm not so tech-minded so I can't offer any more explanation about some of the more techy terms.
Anyway, thanks for reading, and thanks for continuing to stimulate after all these years! It's really nice to see this place continuing to thrive after all of this time!
submitted by oomiak to conspiracy [link] [comments]

1 private key -> 1 public key -> 1 address ?

In some graphics, it seems that with one private key we generate one public key, and with one public key we generate one address. Is it correct?
submitted by thomasbbbb to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Exactly 10 years ago Someone did a transfer of 184M BTC

Exactly 10 Years ago someone found a bug in bitcoin code that allowed him to transfer 184M bitcoins to 3 different address .

On August 15 2010, it was discovered that block 74638 contained a transaction that created 184,467,440,737.09551616 bitcoins for three different addresses.[1][2][3] Two addresses received 92.2 billion bitcoins each, and whoever solved the block got an extra 0.01 BTC that did not exist prior to the transaction. This was possible because the code used for checking transactions before including them in a block didn't account for the case of outputs so large that they overflowed when summed.[4]
A new version of the client was published within five hours of the discovery that contained a soft forking change to the consensus rules that rejected output value overflow transactions (as well as any transaction that paid more than 21 million bitcoins in an output for any reason).[5] The block chain was forked. Although many unpatched nodes continued to build on the "bad" block chain, the "good" block chain overtook it at a block height of 74691[6] at which point all nodes accepted the "good" blockchain as the authoritative source of Bitcoin transaction history.
The bad transaction no longer exists for people using the longest chain. Therefore, the bitcoins created by it do not exist either. While the transaction does not exist anymore, the 0.5 BTC that was consumed by it does. It appears to have come from a faucet and has not been used since.[7]
source : https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Value_overflow_incident

How I even know this ?
I know a guy that I've been to school with and he's been with bitcoin since 2010, while I criticized it and ignored it . lately we've been catching up and talk a lot, he said basically someone is probably manipulating the network in different way while we are unaware of.
"The 184M transaction was bold, everyone could have seen it. In the real world if A really good hacker would do the job , he would do it without us noticing, it will be under the surface, it might be too late if ever could someone else even notice"
I wanted to ask the community what do you think of that ?
could there ever be a way that someone else is using the network to benefit his own needs while exploiting some bug in the network we cant even see?
or that's not possible and he is fooling me ?
submitted by Beginning-Addendum30 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

feature request - manual import WIF private key for Coldcard?

My two satoshis. I'd like the ability to import a standard WIF private key into a Coldcard as an advanced feature. To my knowledge, no hardware wallet has this feature, so it might be a good place to out compete, and be useful for recovering/spending old paper wallets.
submitted by Fiach_Dubh to coldcard [link] [comments]

Best method for longterm cold storage

I've seen previous posts on longterm cold storage recommending the Tordl Wallet Protocols (https://github.com/fresheneesz/TordlWalletProtocols) and while they do look good they're quite complicated.
So I want to ask, what's the general consensus for the best method for longterm cold storage?
So far it seems that several multisig wallets is the general view, but from my research it seems like that introduces various undesirable complexities (eg. how would someone non-technical restore the wallets in an emergency?). Would you have to create all the wallets using offline hardware (eg. several Coldcards?)
Glacier, Yeti? All these seem a bit too complicated compared to how things used to be https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Links_to_Storage_Methods#Cold_Storage_Methods
eg. an encrypted paper wallet or a split wallet using Shamir's Secret Sharing, which apparently isn't recommended any more for some reason.
Any advice?
submitted by boyber to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Exactly 10 years ago Someone did a transfer of 184M BTC

Exactly 10 Years ago someone found a bug in bitcoin code that allowed him to transfer 184M bitcoins to 3 different address .
On August 15 2010, it was discovered that block 74638 contained a transaction that created 184,467,440,737.09551616 bitcoins for three different addresses.[1][2][3] Two addresses received 92.2 billion bitcoins each, and whoever solved the block got an extra 0.01 BTC that did not exist prior to the transaction. This was possible because the code used for checking transactions before including them in a block didn't account for the case of outputs so large that they overflowed when summed.[4] A new version of the client was published within five hours of the discovery that contained a soft forking change to the consensus rules that rejected output value overflow transactions (as well as any transaction that paid more than 21 million bitcoins in an output for any reason).[5] The block chain was forked. Although many unpatched nodes continued to build on the "bad" block chain, the "good" block chain overtook it at a block height of 74691[6] at which point all nodes accepted the "good" blockchain as the authoritative source of Bitcoin transaction history. The bad transaction no longer exists for people using the longest chain. Therefore, the bitcoins created by it do not exist either. While the transaction does not exist anymore, the 0.5 BTC that was consumed by it does. It appears to have come from a faucet and has not been used since.[7]
source : https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Value_overflow_incident
How I even know this ?
I know a guy that I've been to school with and he's been with bitcoin since 2010, while I criticized it and ignored it . lately we've been catching up and talk a lot, he said basically someone is probably manipulating the network in different way while we are unaware of.
"The 184M transaction was bold, everyone could have seen it. In the real world if A really good hacker would do the job , he would do it without us noticing, it will be under the surface, it might be too late if ever could someone else even notice"
I wanted to ask the community what do you think of that ?
could there ever be a way that someone else is using the network to benefit his own needs while exploiting some bug in the network we cant even see?
submitted by Beginning-Addendum30 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Storing your coins safely while not risking loss of keys

This was originally an answer to a question that was asked here, but OP deleted their post.
This might help some newbies (especially the multisig edit at the end), so I want to make sure it's still accessible here.
The original question was whether the Electrum wallet stores a Trezor's private key when using a passphrase.
OP noticed that their Trezor wouldn't connect to their Electrum wallet when entering a different passphrase than they used when creating the wallet. Thus, OP (likely) assumed that the wallet stored the private key, as it somehow knew that a different private key was now used.
Here is my original answer (with some modifications):
IMPORTANT: I'm assuming here that you connected your Trezor by choosing the "hardware wallet" option in Electrum, rather than giving Electrum your 12/24 seed words.
TL;DR: No, your coins are safe :)
I'm assuming by passphrase) you mean the 25th (or 13th) word. When you have this feature enabled, a private key gets generated every time you enter a passphrase. When you enter the same passphrase you used to create the wallet, the wallet with your funds shows up.
Whenever you enter something different, a different private key is generated on your Trezor. This allows you to have multiple different wallets, for example by choosing the passphrases "First Wallet", "Second Wallet", "Third Wallet", or a secret wallet with a secret passphrase.
So whenever you enter a new passphrase when connecting your Trezor to Electrum, the Trezor will send a new public key to Electrum. Electrum will then derive addresses from this public key and check those for balances. It won't find any, as you used a new passphrase.
EDIT: I just realized that you said your wallet doesn't connect to Electrum when you use a different passphrase. This is simply because Electrum doesn't receive the correct public key from the Trezor and therefore Electrum thinks it's a different wallet (which it is).
When you enter the passphrase you used during creation of your wallet, the Trezor will send your actual public key to Electrum, which will then find addresses with balances, which it will show to you. EDIT (to clarify): Connecting your Trezor after creating the wallet is only necessary to send funds or verify addresses, as the public key is already stored in the wallet.dat.
The only thing Electrum actually stores is the public key, which can only be used to look at your Bitcoin, not to move them. You might want to keep this public key a secret as well though, since it links all your funds to you. This is what Electrum stores in the wallet.dat file, which you can just encrypt by choosing a password for it.
Well done using a passphrase by the way! Should someone get their hands on your Trezor, a sophisticated attacker can get the secret key off the device in 15 minutes. Using a passphrase makes this attack almost useless, as the both secret key AND the passphrase are needed to move your funds, and the passphrase is not stored on the device. A passphrase also allows you to hide funds from potential robbers that force you to unlock your wallet.
You can do this by activating the passphrase feature and sending your funds to a wallet with a secret passphrase (do NOT lose this, as losing your passphrase renders your funds inaccessible). Afterwards, you can safely deactivate the passphrase feature, so the device doesn't even ask for one should you get robbed. Simply reactivate it when you need to access your funds.
EDIT: Should you be worried that you might forget your passphrase, you should look into multisig wallets. Depending on how you set this up, you can make it more secure against theft and less likely for you to lose access to your funds.
Say for example you get four wallets: two hardware wallets, a well-protected (airgapped) laptop with Electrum, and a secure mobile wallet that allows for multisig (like Fully Noded).
You can then create a 2-of-4 multisig wallet that requires you to sign transactions with any two of these four wallets.
The increase in security comes from the fact that an attacker now needs full access to two of your devices (or their stored private keys) at once.
At the same time, the fact that you yourself now also need access to only half of your devices means that in the event of a total loss of one (or even two) of them, you can still move your funds to a new wallet.
As long as you do regular checks (e.g. first day of each month), ensuring that you still have access to all your devices' stored private keys, you can always catch a loss of keys and fix this without losing funds (by creating a new multisig wallet and sending the funds there).
This allows you to use a passphrase on your wallets without storing it anywhere physically or digitally. This would usually be very risky, as forgetting the passphrase would lead to a loss of funds, but this risk is now close to eliminated.
(The following part was not in the original answer)
Some IMPORTANT general secruity tips:
  1. Consider including trusted friends and/or family members as co-signers for a multisig wallet. This ensures that it's not even possible for you alone to hand over funds to an attacker. Depending on your level of trust, you might want to make sure that your co-signers can't collaborate to steal your funds (if you include 3 people, create at least a 4-of-n multisig). You could also deliberately make it possible for all or even just some of your co-signers to move your funds (3 co-signers, 3(or less)-of-n multisig) to make sure your funds aren't lost should pass away unexpectedly.
  2. Consider running your own full node and Electrum server (also check the alternatives), which you connect your Electrum wallet to. This ensures that you don't send your public key to anyone else. If someone knows your public key, they know how much BTC you own, making you a potential target.
  3. Always encrypt your wallet.dat (or whatever you called your wallet file), even if it's a watch-only wallet. This protects your public key (see 1. for why you want that).
  4. Create watch-only wallets: Use an airgapped) device to create a wallet with Electrum (make sure to back up the seed phrase) and export the public key. Then create a new watch-only wallet on another device (like your everyday laptop) with that public key to be able to check your funds. To create the initial wallet, you can also use any other hard- or software wallet that allows you to export the master public key.
  5. Hide, or (when using a hardware wallet with a passphrase) even delete your watch-only wallets. Hiding your funds makes you less of a target. When using a hardware wallet, recreating the watch-only wallet is fast and simple, so you don't need to store it if you don't want to check your funds every day. Note that this approach doesn't help much when you don't use a passphrase, as an attacker will obviously check the passphrase-less wallet no matter what.
  6. Keep some funds on your hardware wallet(s). If an attackers sees funds on the wallet(s), they might not force you to enter a passphrase or ask if you have any multisig wallets (lying under pressure is hard).
  7. Hide all your wallets in different places. If someone sees that you have multiple wallets lying around, they might realize you have a multisig wallet.
  8. Don't risk a robber getting (for example) two keys to your 2-of-4 multisig wallet and then racing them to move your funds with the other two keys when they leave. They're gonna come back and be pissed. If it comes to this, you need protection until the robber is caught. STAY SAFE!
  9. The easiest way to solve a problem is to never have it. Don't make yourself a target. If nobody even suspects that you have a multisig (or any wallet at all), they're probably not gonna look for it.
Please correct any mistakes you find and I will edit my post. I will also gladly add more tips to the list. I will of course credit anyone who helps.
Tip for devs who want something cool and important to work on: Make the creation and usage of multisig wallets as noob-friendly as possible. If someone expresses worries about losing access to their funds by forgetting the seed phrase, wallet pin, etc. (someone in my family actually brought this up to me), multisig wallets are the perfect solution as they add redundancy.
submitted by Fittiboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

"Round Numbers" transaction privacy

Sent a transaction earlier that was a round number and saw the Blockstream explorer gives a privacy warning about it that links to this page https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Privacy#Round_numbers
Just curious if there's a better explanation of this concept? I've been in bitcoin for a long time, never heard about this so was just curious. I always assumed using extremely precise transactions would be less private?
submitted by YouTubeFacebook to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The danger when a majority of users is relying on SPV wallets (by belcher_)

This is a repost of a post by u/belcher_ on the bitcoin-dev mailinglist (source). I think it is a good description of why relying on SPV wallets (or someone else's node) can be dangerous for bitcoin from a "macro perspective. For clarification: SPV means "Simplified Payment Verification". In very simple words, it's a wallet that doesn't verify everything on the network (as opposed to what a full node does), and can be fooled in certain attack scenarios, as described below, f.ex.
For example, consider if bitcoin had 10000 users. 10 of them use a full node wallet while the other 9990 use an SPV wallet. If a miner attacked the system by printing infinite bitcoins and spending coins without a valid signature, then the 9990 SPV wallets would accept those fake coins as payment, and trade the coins amongst themselves. After a time those coins would likely be the ancestors of most active coins in the 9990-SPV-wallet ecosystem. Bitcoin would split into two currencies: full-node-coin and SPV-coin.
Now the fraud miners may become well known, perhaps being published on bitcoin news portals, but the 9990-SPV-wallet ecosystem has a strong incentive to be against any rollback. Their recent transactions would disappear and they'd lose money. They would argue that they've already been using the coin for a while, and it works perfectly fine, and anyway a coin that can be spent in 9990 places is more useful than one that can be spent in just 10 places. The SPV-wallet community might even decide to use something like invalidateblock to make sure their SPV-coin doesn't get reorg'd out of existence. There'd also likely be a social attack, with every bitcoin community portal being flooded with bots and shills advocating the merits of SPV-coin. This is not a hypothetical because we already saw the same thing during the scalability conflict 2015-2017.
Before you know it, "Bitcoin" would become SPV-coin with inflation and arbitrary seizure. Any normal user could download software called "Bitcoin wallet" which they trust and have used before, but instead of using Bitcoin they'd be using SPV-coin. You may be one of the 10 wallets backed by a full node, but that won't do much good to you when 9990 users happily use another coin as their medium of exchange.
submitted by TheGreatMuffin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Frag den Trainer! 48  BITCOIN - Wie funktioniert die Blockchain? Acheter ses premiers bitcoins  Tutoriel débutant #1 - YouTube Como Comprar BITCOIN en CHILE [2020 Funcionando] - YouTube 3 tipos de endereço Bitcoin - YouTube BITCOIN TO $6,300 SUPPORT?!!  Deutsche Bank IS BULLISH ON BITCOIN!!!  900,000 BTC Moved!!!

History of Bitcoin cryptocurrency.Bitcoin is a decentralized cryptocurrency created in 2008 by the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto.This account resumes the whole history of Bitcoin since 2008 to 2017 and 2018.. On 18 August 2008, the domain name bitcoin.org was registered.. Later that year on October 31st, a link to a paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic ... Bitcoin (inoffizielle Abkürzung BTC) ist ein Open-Source-Softwareprojekt für die gleichnamige digitale Währung auf Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Basis, das 2009 von Satoshi Nakamoto ins Leben gerufen wurde. Über sogenannte Bitcoin-Adressen kann Geld anonym von einer Wallet-Datei (engl. Geldbörse) bzw. einem speziellen Service über das Netzwerk an andere Adressen überwiesen werden. Im Gegensatz zu ... Bitcoin is a decentralized digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: transaction management and money issuance are carried out collectively by the network. The original Bitcoin software by Satoshi Nakamoto was released under the MIT license. . Most client software, derived or "from ... en:bitcoin. Table of Contents. Anonymity . Wallet. Collecting Bitcoin. Bitcoin Value. Bitcoin is a virtual cryptocurrency present in the game. Bitcoins can be traded for in-game money (or vice-versa). Anonymity. Bitcoin has unique anonymous features. The amount of BTC on a wallet is public. Login / transfers completed on the Bitcoin Market will not contain the user's IP or the wallet key on ... Bitcoin is a peer to peer electronic cash system created by Dr. Craig Wright under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. It was first detailed in the Bitcoin Whitepaper in October 2008, and the source code was released in January 2009. The Bitcoin ledger and Block chain were established with the generation of the Genesis block on the 3rd of January 2009 and the mining of Block 1 six days later on ...

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Frag den Trainer! 48 BITCOIN - Wie funktioniert die Blockchain?

Ist ein $97'000 Bitcoin Preis in 2021 möglich? In diesem Video zeige ich euch warum und wie dieses Preisziel erreicht werden kann. 💙Phemex $112 Extra Bonus: ... Satoshi y bitcoin , unidades de moneda del protocolo. Material de apoyo: Satoshi: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Satoshi_(unit) Bitcoin, Satoshi,USD: https://www... Afinal de contas, o que são os 3 tipos diferentes de endereço do Bitcoin? Como eles interagem entre eles? Venha se confundir mais com o Dov. Resumindo: Todos... Les muestro como comprar Bitcoins en Argentina! Suscríbete para ver el próximo video: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=serchzarate2 SEAMOS... DISCLAIMER: Leverage trading Bitcoin is VERY risky, and 70-80% of all traders lose money. Make sure that you understand these risks if you are a beginner. I only recommend crypto trading to ...

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