Running Bitcoin - Bitcoin Wiki

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

Electroneum Mining Earn up to $50 a day on your mobile

While Bitcoin and Ethereum mining is not expensive and not very profitable for regular users, there are a wide variety of cryptocurrencies that offer an alternative. There is nothing simpler than Electroneum mining and it guarantees money.
What is Electroneum?
Electroneum (ETN) is an anonymous cryptocurrency that runs on the blockchain and is based on the Bytecoin cryptocurrency blockchain. Electroneum cryptocurrency was launched in 2017 by a team of developers at the head of Richard Ells: he wanted to create a cryptocurrency for the smartphone market and games and apps running on these devices. In 2017, the team organized an ICO (they collected $ 40 million earlier than planned) and launched iOS and Android apps for ETN mining.
An important feature of Electroneum is its availability and simplicity of counting. Most Bitcoin owners don’t really like that an asset consists of 100,000,000 satoshi — it complicates the calculations. Electroneum uses only two digits after the separator: Instead of “0.089151 BTC” you will see only 21.45 ETN.
Electroneum has what it takes to be a viable alternative to Bitcoin. Some of the features worth mentioning are:
.The transaction speed and security of the coins are as good as Bitcoin (and some even claim that Electroneum is safer). .It can be stored both in the cloud and in offline wallets. .The development team is impressive. The company consists of professional engineers, entrepreneurs and marketers. .It can be easily removed on a smartphone or other device.
In short, although Electroneum is based on its own chain, it has a lot in common with Bitcoin.
Is Electroneum Mining Profitable?
Electroneum cryptocurrency mining is very simple and affordable: those who don’t even have powerful computers can handle it. You can even use Electroneum on the background of the computer. But there is another distinctive point like below. Since Electroneum was created for use by smartphones, you can mining using your mobile phone.This is the most preferred and easiest
How to make Electroneum mining?
Many crypto owners believe that it is better to mine alone without a pool, but beginners are strongly recommended to start cryptocurrency mining with other participants. Pools allow you to receive payments every day, and Electroneum is supported by many platforms that differ in their commissions and reliability.
Electroneum Mining on Mobile Devices (Android and iOS)
You can earn Electroneum using your mobile phone. Follow these steps to install the app and register as a user:
(https://miro.medium.com/max/2871/1*iW72ofy33FzsOefJuJzcEg.jpeg)
“Download” Barcode reader from this link.
After installing the Barcode reader application on your phone, scan the barcode on the left side
Enter the Code when register the application: D65C7C
Check your email address to find an activation link
Enter your mobile phone. Enter the received SMS code in the field on the registration page.
If you lose your account PIN, enter an alternate email address where you can send recovery information.
Enter your PIN. You will need this every time you start the application or send a transaction.
Return to your inbox and click the link in the letter sent to you. This confirms that you have received a PIN recovery email. You can now enter the application.
This much. All you have to do is click the “Start mining” button.
You started making money
while mining phone
Electroneum Mining on Windows and Mac
Use xmr-stak-cpu software for Electroneum mining on CPU: Claymore provides a higher hash than CPU. The CPU version of this software is available from GitHub.
Download and then open the “config” file via any text editor. You should find the following lines in the text editor:
“Pool_address”: “pool.usxmrpool.com//333” “Wallet_address”: “ “Pool_password”: “
They need to be replaced:
“Pool_address”: “layer + ssl: / /etn-eu1.nanopool.org:13433” “wallet_address”: “Your ETN wallet address” “Pool_password”: “x”
Then look for the line:
“Cpu_threads_conf”: null,
And replace it with the following lines:
“Cpu_threads_conf”: [ {“Low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 0} {“Low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 1} {“low_power_mode”: false, “No_prefetch: true,” affine_to_cpu “: 2} {“ low_power_mode “: false,” no_prefetch “: true, “Affine_to_cpu”: 3} {“low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 3} {“low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 4} {“Low_power_mode”: false , “No_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 5},],
Each line connects the processor core separately. For example, if you have a 6-core processor, you can connect five cores and leave one for work. It is important that the first line starts from zero. Register and run the software.
Alternatively, you can try Electroneum mining GPU — there are both AMD and Nvidia options, but it means buying expensive graphics cards. The reward for a mined block is 7,000 ETN, which is quite generous. But is GPU mining worth the investment? You can check the profitability of electroneum mining here
summary
Electroneum mining is a simple and energy efficient way to earn ETN tokens. If you’re new to crypto mining, consider starting your experience with this coin — having some ETN coins in your crypto portfolio will never hurt.
Since it is a mobile-centric cryptocurrency, you can install Electroneum application on your smartphone and continue mining with a single click every day. This is a small source of passive income. Also, don’t forget to join an Electroneum mining rig.
submitted by tolga1500 to u/tolga1500 [link] [comments]

Transcript of the community Q&A with Steve Shadders and Daniel Connolly of the Bitcoin SV development team. We talk about the path to big blocks, new opcodes, selfish mining, malleability, and why November will lead to a divergence in consensus rules. (Cont in comments)

We've gone through the painstaking process of transcribing the linked interview with Steve Shadders and Daniell Connolly of the Bitcoin SV team. There is an amazing amount of information in this interview that we feel is important for businesses and miners to hear, so we believe it was important to get this is a written form. To avoid any bias, the transcript is taken almost word for word from the video, with just a few changes made for easier reading. If you see any corrections that need to be made, please let us know.
Each question is in bold, and each question and response is timestamped accordingly. You can follow along with the video here:
https://youtu.be/tPImTXFb_U8

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT:

Connor: 02:19.68,0:02:45.10
Alright so thank You Daniel and Steve for joining us. We're joined by Steve Shadders and Daniel Connolly from nChain and also the lead developers of the Satoshi’s Vision client. So Daniel and Steve do you guys just want to introduce yourselves before we kind of get started here - who are you guys and how did you get started?
Steve: 0,0:02:38.83,0:03:30.61
So I'm Steve Shadders and at nChain I am the director of solutions in engineering and specifically for Bitcoin SV I am the technical director of the project which means that I'm a bit less hands-on than Daniel but I handle a lot of the liaison with the miners - that's the conditional project.
Daniel:
Hi I’m Daniel I’m the lead developer for Bitcoin SV. As the team's grown that means that I do less actual coding myself but more organizing the team and organizing what we’re working on.
Connor 03:23.07,0:04:15.98
Great so we took some questions - we asked on Reddit to have people come and post their questions. We tried to take as many of those as we could and eliminate some of the duplicates, so we're gonna kind of go through each question one by one. We added some questions of our own in and we'll try and get through most of these if we can. So I think we just wanted to start out and ask, you know, Bitcoin Cash is a little bit over a year old now. Bitcoin itself is ten years old but in the past a little over a year now what has the process been like for you guys working with the multiple development teams and, you know, why is it important that the Satoshi’s vision client exists today?
Steve: 0:04:17.66,0:06:03.46
I mean yes well we’ve been in touch with the developer teams for quite some time - I think a bi-weekly meeting of Bitcoin Cash developers across all implementations started around November last year. I myself joined those in January or February of this year and Daniel a few months later. So we communicate with all of those teams and I think, you know, it's not been without its challenges. It's well known that there's a lot of disagreements around it, but some what I do look forward to in the near future is a day when the consensus issues themselves are all rather settled, and if we get to that point then there's not going to be much reason for the different developer teams to disagree on stuff. They might disagree on non-consensus related stuff but that's not the end of the world because, you know, Bitcoin Unlimited is free to go and implement whatever they want in the back end of a Bitcoin Unlimited and Bitcoin SV is free to do whatever they want in the backend, and if they interoperate on a non-consensus level great. If they don't not such a big problem there will obviously be bridges between the two, so, yeah I think going forward the complications of having so many personalities with wildly different ideas are going to get less and less.
Cory: 0:06:00.59,0:06:19.59
I guess moving forward now another question about the testnet - a lot of people on Reddit have been asking what the testing process for Bitcoin SV has been like, and if you guys plan on releasing any of those results from the testing?
Daniel: 0:06:19.59,0:07:55.55
Sure yeah so our release will be concentrated on the stability, right, with the first release of Bitcoin SV and that involved doing a large amount of additional testing particularly not so much at the unit test level but at the more system test so setting up test networks, performing tests, and making sure that the software behaved as we expected, right. Confirming the changes we made, making sure that there aren’t any other side effects. Because of, you know, it was quite a rush to release the first version so we've got our test results documented, but not in a way that we can really release them. We're thinking about doing that but we’re not there yet.
Steve: 0:07:50.25,0:09:50.87
Just to tidy that up - we've spent a lot of our time developing really robust test processes and the reporting is something that we can read on our internal systems easily, but we need to tidy that up to give it out for public release. The priority for us was making sure that the software was safe to use. We've established a test framework that involves a progression of code changes through multiple test environments - I think it's five different test environments before it gets the QA stamp of approval - and as for the question about the testnet, yeah, we've got four of them. We've got Testnet One and Testnet Two. A slightly different numbering scheme to the testnet three that everyone's probably used to – that’s just how we reference them internally. They're [1 and 2] both forks of Testnet Three. [Testnet] One we used for activation testing, so we would test things before and after activation - that one’s set to reset every couple of days. The other one [Testnet Two] was set to post activation so that we can test all of the consensus changes. The third one was a performance test network which I think most people have probably have heard us refer to before as Gigablock Testnet. I get my tongue tied every time I try to say that word so I've started calling it the Performance test network and I think we're planning on having two of those: one that we can just do our own stuff with and experiment without having to worry about external unknown factors going on and having other people joining it and doing stuff that we don't know about that affects our ability to baseline performance tests, but the other one (which I think might still be a work in progress so Daniel might be able to answer that one) is one of them where basically everyone will be able to join and they can try and mess stuff up as bad as they want.
Daniel: 0:09:45.02,0:10:20.93
Yeah, so we so we recently shared the details of Testnet One and Two with the with the other BCH developer groups. The Gigablock test network we've shared up with one group so far but yeah we're building it as Steve pointed out to be publicly accessible.
Connor: 0:10:18.88,0:10:44.00
I think that was my next question I saw that you posted on Twitter about the revived Gigablock testnet initiative and so it looked like blocks bigger than 32 megabytes were being mined and propagated there, but maybe the block explorers themselves were coming down - what does that revived Gigablock test initiative look like?
Daniel: 0:10:41.62,0:11:58.34
That's what did the Gigablock test network is. So the Gigablock test network was first set up by Bitcoin Unlimited with nChain’s help and they did some great work on that, and we wanted to revive it. So we wanted to bring it back and do some large-scale testing on it. It's a flexible network - at one point we had we had eight different large nodes spread across the globe, sort of mirroring the old one. Right now we scaled back because we're not using it at the moment so they'll notice I think three. We have produced some large blocks there and it's helped us a lot in our research and into the scaling capabilities of Bitcoin SV, so it's guided the work that the team’s been doing for the last month or two on the improvements that we need for scalability.
Steve: 0:11:56.48,0:13:34.25
I think that's actually a good point to kind of frame where our priorities have been in kind of two separate stages. I think, as Daniel mentioned before, because of the time constraints we kept the change set for the October 15 release as minimal as possible - it was just the consensus changes. We didn't do any work on performance at all and we put all our focus and energy into establishing the QA process and making sure that that change was safe and that was a good process for us to go through. It highlighted what we were missing in our team – we got our recruiters very busy recruiting of a Test Manager and more QA people. The second stage after that is performance related work which, as Daniel mentioned, the results of our performance testing fed into what tasks we were gonna start working on for the performance related stuff. Now that work is still in progress - some of the items that we identified the code is done and that's going through the QA process but it’s not quite there yet. That's basically the two-stage process that we've been through so far. We have a roadmap that goes further into the future that outlines more stuff, but primarily it’s been QA first, performance second. The performance enhancements are close and on the horizon but some of that work should be ongoing for quite some time.
Daniel: 0:13:37.49,0:14:35.14
Some of the changes we need for the performance are really quite large and really get down into the base level view of the software. There's kind of two groups of them mainly. One that are internal to the software – to Bitcoin SV itself - improving the way it works inside. And then there's other ones that interface it with the outside world. One of those in particular we're working closely with another group to make a compatible change - it's not consensus changing or anything like that - but having the same interface on multiple different implementations will be very helpful right, so we're working closely with them to make improvements for scalability.
Connor: 0:14:32.60,0:15:26.45
Obviously for Bitcoin SV one of the main things that you guys wanted to do that that some of the other developer groups weren't willing to do right now is to increase the maximum default block size to 128 megabytes. I kind of wanted to pick your brains a little bit about - a lot of the objection to either removing the box size entirely or increasing it on a larger scale is this idea of like the infinite block attack right and that kind of came through in a lot of the questions. What are your thoughts on the “infinite block attack” and is it is it something that that really exists, is it something that miners themselves should be more proactive on preventing, or I guess what are your thoughts on that attack that everyone says will happen if you uncap the block size?
Steve: 0:15:23.45,0:18:28.56
I'm often quoted on Twitter and Reddit - I've said before the infinite block attack is bullshit. Now, that's a statement that I suppose is easy to take out of context, but I think the 128 MB limit is something where there’s probably two schools of thought about. There are some people who think that you shouldn't increase the limit to 128 MB until the software can handle it, and there are others who think that it's fine to do it now so that the limit is increased when the software can handle it and you don’t run into the limit when this when the software improves and can handle it. Obviously we’re from the latter school of thought. As I said before we've got a bunch of performance increases, performance enhancements, in the pipeline. If we wait till May to increase the block size limit to 128 MB then those performance enhancements will go in, but we won't be able to actually demonstrate it on mainnet. As for the infinitive block attack itself, I mean there are a number of mitigations that you can put in place. I mean firstly, you know, going down to a bit of the tech detail - when you send a block message or send any peer to peer message there's a header which has the size of the message. If someone says they're sending you a 30MB message and you're receiving it and it gets to 33MB then obviously you know something's wrong so you can drop the connection. If someone sends you a message that's 129 MB and you know the block size limit is 128 you know it’s kind of pointless to download that message. So I mean these are just some of the mitigations that you can put in place. When I say the attack is bullshit, I mean I mean it is bullshit from the sense that it's really quite trivial to prevent it from happening. I think there is a bit of a school of thought in the Bitcoin world that if it's not in the software right now then it kind of doesn't exist. I disagree with that, because there are small changes that can be made to work around problems like this. One other aspect of the infinite block attack, and let’s not call it the infinite block attack, let's just call it the large block attack - it takes a lot of time to validate that we gotten around by having parallel pipelines for blocks to come in, so you've got a block that's coming in it's got a unknown stuck on it for two hours or whatever downloading and validating it. At some point another block is going to get mined b someone else and as long as those two blocks aren't stuck in a serial pipeline then you know the problem kind of goes away.
Cory: 0:18:26.55,0:18:48.27
Are there any concerns with the propagation of those larger blocks? Because there's a lot of questions around you know what the practical size of scaling right now Bitcoin SV could do and the concerns around propagating those blocks across the whole network.
Steve 0:18:45.84,0:21:37.73
Yes, there have been concerns raised about it. I think what people forget is that compact blocks and xThin exist, so if a 32MB block is not send 32MB of data in most cases, almost all cases. The concern here that I think I do find legitimate is the Great Firewall of China. Very early on in Bitcoin SV we started talking with miners on the other side of the firewall and that was one of their primary concerns. We had anecdotal reports of people who were having trouble getting a stable connection any faster than 200 kilobits per second and even with compact blocks you still need to get the transactions across the firewall. So we've done a lot of research into that - we tested our own links across the firewall, rather CoinGeeks links across the firewall as they’ve given us access to some of their servers so that we can play around, and we were able to get sustained rates of 50 to 90 megabits per second which pushes that problem quite a long way down the road into the future. I don't know the maths off the top of my head, but the size of the blocks that can sustain is pretty large. So we're looking at a couple of options - it may well be the chattiness of the peer-to-peer protocol causes some of these issues with the Great Firewall, so we have someone building a bridge concept/tool where you basically just have one kind of TX vacuum on either side of the firewall that collects them all up and sends them off every one or two seconds as a single big chunk to eliminate some of that chattiness. The other is we're looking at building a multiplexer that will sit and send stuff up to the peer-to-peer network on one side and send it over splitters, to send it over multiple links, reassemble it on the other side so we can sort of transition the great Firewall without too much trouble, but I mean getting back to the core of your question - yes there is a theoretical limit to block size propagation time and that's kind of where Moore's Law comes in. Putting faster links and you kick that can further down the road and you just keep on putting in faster links. I don't think 128 main blocks are going to be an issue though with the speed of the internet that we have nowadays.
Connor: 0:21:34.99,0:22:17.84
One of the other changes that you guys are introducing is increasing the max script size so I think right now it’s going from 201 to 500 [opcodes]. So I guess a few of the questions we got was I guess #1 like why not uncap it entirely - I think you guys said you ran into some concerns while testing that - and then #2 also specifically we had a question about how certain are you that there are no remaining n squared bugs or vulnerabilities left in script execution?
Steve: 0:22:15.50,0:25:36.79
It's interesting the decision - we were initially planning on removing that cap altogether and the next cap that comes into play after that (next effective cap is a 10,000 byte limit on the size of the script). We took a more conservative route and decided to wind that back to 500 - it's interesting that we got some criticism for that when the primary criticism I think that was leveled against us was it’s dangerous to increase that limit to unlimited. We did that because we’re being conservative. We did some research into these log n squared bugs, sorry – attacks, that people have referred to. We identified a few of them and we had a hard think about it and thought - look if we can find this many in a short time we can fix them all (the whack-a-mole approach) but it does suggest that there may well be more unknown ones. So we thought about putting, you know, taking the whack-a-mole approach, but that doesn't really give us any certainty. We will fix all of those individually but a more global approach is to make sure that if anyone does discover one of these scripts it doesn't bring the node to a screaming halt, so the problem here is because the Bitcoin node is essentially single-threaded, if you get one of these scripts that locks up the script engine for a long time everything that's behind it in the queue has to stop and wait. So what we wanted to do, and this is something we've got an engineer actively working on right now, is once that script validation goad path is properly paralyzed (parts of it already are), then we’ll basically assign a few threads for well-known transaction templates, and a few threads for any any type of script. So if you get a few scripts that are nasty and lock up a thread for a while that's not going to stop the node from working because you've got these other kind of lanes of the highway that are exclusively reserved for well-known script templates and they'll just keep on passing through. Once you've got that in place, and I think we're in a much better position to get rid of that limit entirely because the worst that's going to happen is your non-standard script pipelines get clogged up but everything else will keep keep ticking along - there are other mitigations for this as well I mean I know you could always put a time limit on script execution if they wanted to, and that would be something that would be up to individual miners. Bitcoin SV's job I think is to provide the tools for the miners and the miners can then choose, you know, how to make use of them - if they want to set time limits on script execution then that's a choice for them.
Daniel: 0:25:34.82,0:26:15.85
Yeah, I'd like to point out that a node here, when it receives a transaction through the peer to peer network, it doesn't have to accept that transaction, you can reject it. If it looks suspicious to the node it can just say you know we're not going to deal with that, or if it takes more than five minutes to execute, or more than a minute even, it can just abort and discard that transaction, right. The only time we can’t do that is when it's in a block already, but then it could decide to reject the block as well. It's all possibilities there could be in the software.
Steve: 0:26:13.08,0:26:20.64
Yeah, and if it's in a block already it means someone else was able to validate it so…
Cory: 0,0:26:21.21,0:26:43.60
There’s a lot of discussions about the re-enabled opcodes coming – OP_MUL, OP_INVERT, OP_LSHIFT, and OP_RSHIFT up invert op l shift and op r shift you maybe explain the significance of those op codes being re-enabled?
Steve: 0:26:42.01,0:28:17.01
Well I mean one of one of the most significant things is other than two, which are minor variants of DUP and MUL, they represent almost the complete set of original op codes. I think that's not necessarily a technical issue, but it's an important milestone. MUL is one that's that I've heard some interesting comments about. People ask me why are you putting OP_MUL back in if you're planning on changing them to big number operations instead of the 32-bit limit that they're currently imposed upon. The simple answer to that question is that we currently have all of the other arithmetic operations except for OP_MUL. We’ve got add divide, subtract, modulo – it’s odd to have a script system that's got all the mathematical primitives except for multiplication. The other answer to that question is that they're useful - we've talked about a Rabin signature solution that basically replicates the function of DATASIGVERIFY. That's just one example of a use case for this - most cryptographic primitive operations require mathematical operations and bit shifts are useful for a whole ton of things. So it's really just about completing that work and completing the script engine, or rather not completing it, but putting it back the way that it was it was meant to be.
Connor 0:28:20.42,0:29:22.62
Big Num vs 32 Bit. I've seen Daniel - I think I saw you answer this on Reddit a little while ago, but the new op codes using logical shifts and Satoshi’s version use arithmetic shifts - the general question that I think a lot of people keep bringing up is, maybe in a rhetorical way but they say why not restore it back to the way Satoshi had it exactly - what are the benefits of changing it now to operate a little bit differently?
Daniel: 0:29:18.75,0:31:12.15
Yeah there's two parts there - the big number one and the L shift being a logical shift instead of arithmetic. so when we re-enabled these opcodes we've looked at them carefully and have adjusted them slightly as we did in the past with OP_SPLIT. So the new LSHIFT and RSHIFT are bitwise operators. They can be used to implement arithmetic based shifts - I think I've posted a short script that did that, but we can't do it the other way around, right. You couldn't use an arithmetic shift operator to implement a bitwise one. It's because of the ordering of the bytes in the arithmetic values, so the values that represent numbers. The little endian which means they're swapped around to what many other systems - what I've considered normal - or big-endian. And if you start shifting that properly as a number then then shifting sequence in the bytes is a bit strange, so it couldn't go the other way around - you couldn't implement bitwise shift with arithmetic, so we chose to make them bitwise operators - that's what we proposed.
Steve: 0:31:10.57,0:31:51.51
That was essentially a decision that was actually made in May, or rather a consequence of decisions that were made in May. So in May we reintroduced OP_AND, OP_OR, and OP_XOR, and that was also another decision to replace three different string operators with OP_SPLIT was also made. So that was not a decision that we've made unilaterally, it was a decision that was made collectively with all of the BCH developers - well not all of them were actually in all of the meetings, but they were all invited.
Daniel: 0:31:48.24,0:32:23.13
Another example of that is that we originally proposed OP_2DIV and OP_2MUL was it, I think, and this is a single operator that multiplies the value by two, right, but it was pointed out that that can very easily be achieved by just doing multiply by two instead of having a separate operator for it, so we scrapped those, we took them back out, because we wanted to keep the number of operators minimum yeah.
Steve: 0:32:17.59,0:33:47.20
There was an appetite around for keeping the operators minimal. I mean the decision about the idea to replace OP_SUBSTR, OP_LEFT, OP_RIGHT with OP_SPLIT operator actually came from Gavin Andresen. He made a brief appearance in the Telegram workgroups while we were working out what to do with May opcodes and obviously Gavin's word kind of carries a lot of weight and we listen to him. But because we had chosen to implement the May opcodes (the bitwise opcodes) and treat the data as big-endian data streams (well, sorry big-endian not really applicable just plain data strings) it would have been completely inconsistent to implement LSHIFT and RSHIFT as integer operators because then you would have had a set of bitwise operators that operated on two different kinds of data, which would have just been nonsensical and very difficult for anyone to work with, so yeah. I mean it's a bit like P2SH - it wasn't a part of the original Satoshi protocol that once some things are done they're done and you know if you want to want to make forward progress you've got to work within that that framework that exists.
Daniel: 0:33:45.85,0:34:48.97
When we get to the big number ones then it gets really complicated, you know, number implementations because then you can't change the behavior of the existing opcodes, and I don't mean OP_MUL, I mean the other ones that have been there for a while. You can't suddenly make them big number ones without seriously looking at what scripts there might be out there and the impact of that change on those existing scripts, right. The other the other point is you don't know what scripts are out there because of P2SH - there could be scripts that you don't know the content of and you don't know what effect changing the behavior of these operators would mean. The big number thing is tricky, so another option might be, yeah, I don't know what the options for though it needs some serious thought.
Steve: 0:34:43.27,0:35:24.23
That’s something we've reached out to the other implementation teams about - actually really would like their input on the best ways to go about restoring big number operations. It has to be done extremely carefully and I don't know if we'll get there by May next year, or when, but we’re certainly willing to put a lot of resources into it and we're more than happy to work with BU or XT or whoever wants to work with us on getting that done and getting it done safely.
Connor: 0:35:19.30,0:35:57.49
Kind of along this similar vein, you know, Bitcoin Core introduced this concept of standard scripts, right - standard and non-standard scripts. I had pretty interesting conversation with Clemens Ley about use cases for “non-standard scripts” as they're called. I know at least one developer on Bitcoin ABC is very hesitant, or kind of pushed back on him about doing that and so what are your thoughts about non-standard scripts and the entirety of like an IsStandard check?
Steve: 0:35:58.31,0:37:35.73
I’d actually like to repurpose the concept. I think I mentioned before multi-threaded script validation and having some dedicated well-known script templates - when you say the word well-known script template there’s already a check in Bitcoin that kind of tells you if it's well-known or not and that's IsStandard. I'm generally in favor of getting rid of the notion of standard transactions, but it's actually a decision for miners, and it's really more of a behavioral change than it is a technical change. There's a whole bunch of configuration options that miners can set that affect what they do what they consider to be standard and not standard, but the reality is not too many miners are using those configuration options. So I mean standard transactions as a concept is meaningful to an arbitrary degree I suppose, but yeah I would like to make it easier for people to get non-standard scripts into Bitcoin so that they can experiment, and from discussions of I’ve had with CoinGeek they’re quite keen on making their miners accept, you know, at least initially a wider variety of transactions eventually.
Daniel: 0:37:32.85,0:38:07.95
So I think IsStandard will remain important within the implementation itself for efficiency purposes, right - you want to streamline base use case of cash payments through them and prioritizing. That's where it will remain important but on the interfaces from the node to the rest of the network, yeah I could easily see it being removed.
Cory: 0,0:38:06.24,0:38:35.46
*Connor mentioned that there's some people that disagree with Bitcoin SV and what they're doing - a lot of questions around, you know, why November? Why implement these changes in November - they think that maybe the six-month delay might not cause a split. Well, first off what do you think about the ideas of a potential split and I guess what is the urgency for November?
Steve: 0:38:33.30,0:40:42.42
Well in November there's going to be a divergence of consensus rules regardless of whether we implement these new op codes or not. Bitcoin ABC released their spec for the November Hard fork change I think on August 16th or 17th something like that and their client as well and it included CTOR and it included DSV. Now for the miners that commissioned the SV project, CTOR and DSV are controversial changes and once they're in they're in. They can't be reversed - I mean CTOR maybe you could reverse it at a later date, but DSV once someone's put a P2SH transaction into the project or even a non P2SH transaction in the blockchain using that opcode it's irreversible. So it's interesting that some people refer to the Bitcoin SV project as causing a split - we're not proposing to do anything that anyone disagrees with - there might be some contention about changing the opcode limit but what we're doing, I mean Bitcoin ABC already published their spec for May and it is our spec for the new opcodes, so in terms of urgency - should we wait? Well the fact is that we can't - come November you know it's bit like Segwit - once Segwit was in, yes you arguably could get it out by spending everyone's anyone can spend transactions but in reality it's never going to be that easy and it's going to cause a lot of economic disruption, so yeah that's it. We're putting out changes in because it's not gonna make a difference either way in terms of whether there's going to be a divergence of consensus rules - there's going to be a divergence whether whatever our changes are. Our changes are not controversial at all.
Daniel: 0:40:39.79,0:41:03.08
If we didn't include these changes in the November upgrade we'd be pushing ahead with a no-change, right, but the November upgrade is there so we should use it while we can. Adding these non-controversial changes to it.
Connor: 0:41:01.55,0:41:35.61
Can you talk about DATASIGVERIFY? What are your concerns with it? The general concept that's been kind of floated around because of Ryan Charles is the idea that it's a subsidy, right - that it takes a whole megabyte and kind of crunches that down and the computation time stays the same but maybe the cost is lesser - do you kind of share his view on that or what are your concerns with it?
Daniel: 0:41:34.01,0:43:38.41
Can I say one or two things about this – there’s different ways to look at that, right. I'm an engineer - my specialization is software, so the economics of it I hear different opinions. I trust some more than others but I am NOT an economist. I kind of agree with the ones with my limited expertise on that it's a subsidy it looks very much like it to me, but yeah that's not my area. What I can talk about is the software - so adding DSV adds really quite a lot of complexity to the code right, and it's a big change to add that. And what are we going to do - every time someone comes up with an idea we’re going to add a new opcode? How many opcodes are we going to add? I saw reports that Jihan was talking about hundreds of opcodes or something like that and it's like how big is this client going to become - how big is this node - is it going to have to handle every kind of weird opcode that that's out there? The software is just going to get unmanageable and DSV - that was my main consideration at the beginning was the, you know, if you can implement it in script you should do it, because that way it keeps the node software simple, it keeps it stable, and you know it's easier to test that it works properly and correctly. It's almost like adding (?) code from a microprocessor you know why would you do that if you can if you can implement it already in the script that is there.
Steve: 0:43:36.16,0:46:09.71
It’s actually an interesting inconsistency because when we were talking about adding the opcodes in May, the philosophy that seemed to drive the decisions that we were able to form a consensus around was to simplify and keep the opcodes as minimal as possible (ie where you could replicate a function by using a couple of primitive opcodes in combination, that was preferable to adding a new opcode that replaced) OP_SUBSTR is an interesting example - it's a combination of SPLIT, and SWAP and DROP opcodes to achieve it. So at really primitive script level we've got this philosophy of let's keep it minimal and at this sort of (?) philosophy it’s all let's just add a new opcode for every primitive function and Daniel's right - it's a question of opening the floodgates. Where does it end? If we're just going to go down this road, it almost opens up the argument why have a scripting language at all? Why not just add a hard code all of these functions in one at a time? You know, pay to public key hash is a well-known construct (?) and not bother executing a script at all but once we've done that we take away with all of the flexibility for people to innovate, so it's a philosophical difference, I think, but I think it's one where the position of keeping it simple does make sense. All of the primitives are there to do what people need to do. The things that people don't feel like they can't do are because of the limits that exist. If we had no opcode limit at all, if you could make a gigabyte transaction so a gigabyte script, then you can do any kind of crypto that you wanted even with 32-bit integer operations, Once you get rid of the 32-bit limit of course, a lot of those a lot of those scripts come up a lot smaller, so a Rabin signature script shrinks from 100MB to a couple hundred bytes.
Daniel: 0:46:06.77,0:47:36.65
I lost a good six months of my life diving into script, right. Once you start getting into the language and what it can do, it is really pretty impressive how much you can achieve within script. Bitcoin was designed, was released originally, with script. I mean it didn't have to be – it could just be instead of having a transaction with script you could have accounts and you could say trust, you know, so many BTC from this public key to this one - but that's not the way it was done. It was done using script, and script provides so many capabilities if you start exploring it properly. If you start really digging into what it can do, yeah, it's really amazing what you can do with script. I'm really looking forward to seeing some some very interesting applications from that. I mean it was Awemany his zero-conf script was really interesting, right. I mean it relies on DSV which is a problem (and some other things that I don't like about it), but him diving in and using script to solve this problem was really cool, it was really good to see that.
Steve: 0:47:32.78,0:48:16.44
I asked a question to a couple of people in our research team that have been working on the Rabin signature stuff this morning actually and I wasn't sure where they are up to with this, but they're actually working on a proof of concept (which I believe is pretty close to done) which is a Rabin signature script - it will use smaller signatures so that it can fit within the current limits, but it will be, you know, effectively the same algorithm (as DSV) so I can't give you an exact date on when that will happen, but it looks like we'll have a Rabin signature in the blockchain soon (a mini-Rabin signature).
Cory: 0:48:13.61,0:48:57.63
Based on your responses I think I kinda already know the answer to this question, but there's a lot of questions about ending experimentation on Bitcoin. I was gonna kind of turn that into – with the plan that Bitcoin SV is on do you guys see like a potential one final release, you know that there's gonna be no new opcodes ever released (like maybe five years down the road we just solidify the base protocol and move forward with that) or are you guys more on the idea of being open-ended with appropriate testing that we can introduce new opcodes under appropriate testing.
Steve: 0:48:55.80,0:49:47.43
I think you've got a factor in what I said before about the philosophical differences. I think new functionality can be introduced just fine. Having said that - yes there is a place for new opcodes but it's probably a limited place and in my opinion the cryptographic primitive functions for example CHECKSIG uses ECDSA with a specific elliptic curve, hash 256 uses SHA256 - at some point in the future those are going to no longer be as secure as we would like them to be and we'll replace them with different hash functions, verification functions, at some point, but I think that's a long way down the track.
Daniel: 0:49:42.47,0:50:30.3
I'd like to see more data too. I'd like to see evidence that these things are needed, and the way I could imagine that happening is that, you know, that with the full scripting language some solution is implemented and we discover that this is really useful, and over a period of, like, you know measured in years not days, we find a lot of transactions are using this feature, then maybe, you know, maybe we should look at introducing an opcode to optimize it, but optimizing before we even know if it's going to be useful, yeah, that's the wrong approach.
Steve: 0:50:28.19,0:51:45.29
I think that optimization is actually going to become an economic decision for the miners. From the miner’s point of view is if it'll make more sense for them to be able to optimize a particular process - does it reduce costs for them such that they can offer a better service to everyone else? Yeah, so ultimately these decisions are going to be miner’s main decisions, not developer decisions. Developers of course can offer their input - I wouldn't expect every miner to be an expert on script, but as we're already seeing miners are actually starting to employ their own developers. I’m not just talking about us - there are other miners in China that I know have got some really bright people on their staff that question and challenge all of the changes - study them and produce their own reports. We've been lucky with actually being able to talk to some of those people and have some really fascinating technical discussions with them.
submitted by The_BCH_Boys to btc [link] [comments]

All Usernames

Popularity Number Tried Usernames
1 root
2 admin
3 guest
4 supervisor
5 Administrator
6 user
7 tech
8 ubnt
9 default
10 support
11 service
12 888888
13 admin1
14 mother
15 666666
16 test
17 oracle
18 ftpuser
19 usuario
20 test1
21 test2
22 123456
23 test123
24 123
25 321
26 password
27 [email protected]
28 postgres
29 dev
30 testuser
31 tomcat
32 git
33 dspace
34 nexus
35 zabbix
36 teamspeak
37 ftpuser1
38 ubuntu
39 ts3
40 www-data
41 ldapuser1
42 minecraft
43 ghost
44 butter
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46 ts
47 teamspeak3
48 hadoop
49 tonyeadmin
50 pi
51 odoo
52 mysql
53 contador
54 cron
55 wp
56 ftp
57 weblogic
58 backup
59 ftp_user
60 ts3bot
61 1234
62 bin
63 student
64 user1
65 tom
66 ts3server
67 nagios
68 duni
69 test321
70 e8ehome
71 telecomadmin
72 db2fenc1
73 bitcoin
74 a
75 deploy
76 nginx
77 db2inst1
78 hdfs
79 abc123
80 jenkins
81 web1
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83 operator
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86 camera
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88 baikal
89 tplink
90 cssserver
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92 admins
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97 y
98 odoo9
99 zookeeper
100 mahdi
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102 www
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104 111111
105 ftp_test
106 flw
107 b
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110 ohh
111 ops
112 abc123456
113 user8
114 ScryptingTh3cod3r~F
115 ts3user
116 centos
117 svn
118 user9
119 postgres123
120 vagrant
121 gituser
122 enable
123 elastic
124 user2
125 daemon
126 user3
127 walter
128 VM
129 havanaloca
130 csgoserver
131 demo
132 CUAdmin
133 servercsgo
134 css
135 spark
136 ftptest
137 data
138 localadmin
139 wangjc
140 ispadmin
141 1
142 adam
143 Accept-Language: zh-CN,zh;q=0.8
144 web
145 client
146 xuelp123
147 workpress
148 openssh-portable-com
149 cacti
150 zs
151 cubie
152 informix
153 Contact:
154 conf
155 hbase
156 ranger
157 msn
158 bot
159 spark1
160 radio
161 xc3511
162 pass
163 dev123
164 maven-assest
165 noah
166 linktechs
167 query
168 bot1
169 informix123
170 gzw
171 tss
172 NETBASE
173 es
174 oracle123
175 user123
176 mcserver
177 ftpadmin
178 linuxshell
179 app
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181 wangshaojie
182 knox
183 org
184 nmstest
185 elasearch
186 Xinjiang
187 aticara
188 555
189 [email protected]
190 wwwdata
191 sh
192 jenkins123
193 henry
194 licongcong
195 crontab
196 oldbody
197 tez
198 122.152.213.96
199 zhang
200 Shaanxi
201 nobody
202 cf46e3bdb4b929f1
203 ethereum
204 aa
205 Jay123
206 ionhasbeenidle13hr
207 mysql-data
208 system
209 localhost
210 [email protected]
211 dzldblog
212 linuxprobe
213 bdos
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216 zhouh
217 amx
218 wanjm
219 MPE
220 aaa
221 NISECTC5002
222 ec2-user
223 sandiego
224 iptv
225 shell
226 confluence
227 matthew
228 bizf
229 backupdb
230 hive
231 dell
232 tornado
233 zhou
234 blender
235 user0
236 c
237 @Huawei123
238 net
239 cat1
240 watch 'sh'
241 haohuoyanxuan
242 administrador
243 text
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245 wybiftp
246 share
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248 squid
249 kafka
250 db2as
251 PRODDTA
252 bitcoinj
253 user01
254 cc
255 [email protected]
256 12345
257 azureadmin
258 duanhw
259
260 zhangfei
261 easton
262 geoeast
263 lwx
264 ldd
265 aws
266 gv1
267 140.115.53.10
268 useradmin
269 tlah
270 walletjs
271 ccc
272 user4
273 solr
274 chef
275 python
276 GET / HTTP/1.0
277 12345678
278 customer
279 sss
280 geminiblue
281 ausftp
282 Chongqing
283 nologin
284 username
285 mining
286 user11
287 news
288 2
289 muiehack9999
290 user5
291 ubuntu123
292 docker
293 nexxadmin
294 wq
295 OPTIONS / HTTP/1.0
296 gpadmin
297 test5
298 kuangwh
299 nagios123
300 ams
301 gfs1
302 vsb_pgsql
303 140.238.189.155
304 carl
305 CONNECT ip.ws.126.net:443 HTTP/1.1
306 nvidia
307 wallet
308 [email protected]
309 3
310 db2fenc1123
311 user6
312 www1
313 andy
314 assest
315 OPTIONS / RTSP/1.0
316 azure
317 webftp
318 tab3
319 aliyun
320 smartworldmss
321 hcat
322 walle
323 zhangfeng
324 openlgtv
325 User-Agent: Go-http-client/1.1
326 wangw
327 kelly
328 usuario1
329 [email protected]#
330 x
331 Huawei1234
332 user7
333 sysadmin
334 video
335 tmp
336 GET /nice%20ports%2C/Tri%6Eity.txt%2ebak HTTP/1.0
337 dianzhong
338 clfs
339 wangk123
340 rsync
341 livy
342 xuezw
343 hduser
344 testing
345 HEAD http://123.125.114.144/ HTTP/1.1
346 bitcoind
347 matrix
348 cassandra
349 xx
350 F
351 backups
352 ktuser
353 barbara
354 sunxinming
355 OPTIONS sip:nm SIP/2.0
356 ftpuser123
357 michael
358 jiang
359 wangh
360 wolf
361 ikan
362 122.88.49.75
363 monitor
364 Proxy-Authorization: Basic Og==
365 pentaho
366 rootadmin123
367 wildfly
368 xxx
369 nobodymuiefazan123456
370
371 www2
372 serial#
373 From: ;tag=root
374 cat2
375 alice
376 robot
377 wowza
378 visitor
379 tab2
380 elasticsearch
381 gbase
382 motorola
383 superuser
384 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.01688858 Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/62.0.3202.75 Safari/537.36
385 sara
386 Jaydell123
387 linuxacademy
388 vps
389 xbmc
390 software
391 Call-ID: 50000
392 felix
393 portal
394 backupdb140
395 bdos123
396 greenplum
397 sshd
398 Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,image/webp,/;q=0.8
399 daemond
400 qwe123
401 webmaster
402 [email protected]#
403 web13
404 bpadmin
405 ligh
406 leo
407 Max-Forwards: 70
408 password123
409 vivacom
410 dbvisa
411 tab
412 mongo
413 ggg
submitted by Admir4l88 to Admir4l88Data [link] [comments]

Run a 0.14 Full-Node on RaspberryPi3 Pruned(less than 16GB SD needed)

Hi!
Happy if this guide helps you.
Tip if you want: 19656Uwdwko5RjtnuwQENpjBwE3ChzD59v
UPDATE 04/06/17
Add 'uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148' into your bitcoin.conf if you want to signal UASF.
UPDATE 03/13/17
ADDED a tl;dr; Version at the end of this Post.
UPDATE 03/12/17:
Just to test it - I reinstalled all on 8GB SD and it works as well. But maybe you should use at least 16GB for the beginning.
Using a 128GB card for the first version was a little bit stupid - so I reinstalled everything on a 8GB SD card. Including Linux and a pruned blockchain - and it works.
I used prune=550 and Jessie Lite (headless / command line) - without wallet and gui.
The SD is almost full, but it works so far
I also updated the whole manual a bit to make things more clear. Thank you for all your feedback!
Just started my Bitcoin Node today and wanted to share the way I did it with people who are interested in running their own full node. It took some time to write everything down - hopefully correct so far.
I am sure, many people around bitcoin are way more informed and educated as I am - I am the noob. So I wrote this manual to help users like me - noobs, to get started with a cheap, simple bitcoin node on raspberry pi.
Have fun!
I wanted to get my Raspberry Pi 3 working as a node to support the network. Actually the process of installing and running the node was more or less easy - but for Noobs (like I am) it might be a bit tricky to start the whole thing, because there are different ways.
Did you - like me - think you would need +120GB on the raspi, external USB HDD to be a full node? You won't!
If you have a Raspberry and you know what Bitcoin is, I guess, you are a little bit aware of linux, networks and of course bitcoin - so I won't go into detail too much.
This guide is just a little helper to get a full node running on your raspberry pi. Thanks to the help of the nice people in this sub and of course the documentation by the developers, I got it working - and of course also special thanks to raspnode.com - as I followed their tutorial to start - I went some other ways here and there - so please read carefully.
For the Part 2 I would suggest to have http://raspnode.com/diyBitcoin.html open and read through my manual.
I split the tutorial in 2 Parts - PART ONE is about installing the client on your PC and downloading the Blockchain.
PART TWO is about the setup of the raspberryPi and transferring the pruned blockchain to the pi and run it as a full node!
The first thing to be aware of is: You actually need to download the whole blockchain to get this working - if you already have your bitcoin client synced on the PC / MAC great you can reuse it!
Now you might think "but you said less than 16GB in the title!"
Yes, but the good thing is you won't need to download it on your Raspberry, neither you need to sync it completely on your raspberry which took ages (weeks!) before. When you finished this Guide, you will just have a max. 4GB Blockchain on your Raspberry Pi - but it still is a full node! The magic word is Pruning.
Maybe even a 8GB SD Card works just fine including Linux (jessie lite)!
So, if you already have a full node on your PC - Great you can almost skip PART ONE - BUT have at how to Prune in PART ONE if you don't know about it.
For PART TWO you'll need a Raspberry Pi 2 or 3 (I used 3) min. 8GB (works also) or better 16GB SD Card. (I used a 128GB for the first version of this manual - which is way too big)

PART ONE

This is the manual how to get started on you PC / MAC / Linux (I did it on Win7)
Go to: https://bitcoin.org/en/download and download the core Client for your Machine (I used win64).
Install it and configure it to save the Blockchaindata to the directory of your choice - so instead getting 120GB on your C drive, I would suggest to download it to another place like a USB drive.
You can set this up during the install. Standard folder for the blockchain folder is "%APPDATA%\Bitcoin" on Windows.
or you can do it after the install by creating a bitcoin.conf file inside your installation folder / or %APPDATA%\Bitcoin and add
datadir=l:\yourfolder
to the file. Line by line.
By the way here you could also just add dbcache - to use more memory to speed up the process a bit:
dbcache=4096
if you don't want to use the settings inside the program. (you can also set this inside the program under settings! If you have this inside the bitcoin.conf you will see the amount you set there from inside the program - it overrides the values)
You can check inside the windows client under settings, if you can see a manual dbcache is set by having a look at the left footer area. When your dbcache value shows up, everything is fine.
So the Blockchain download process will take time - maybe a few days! Depending on your machine, internet connection and HDD.
The Blockchain is huge as it contains every single transaction of the past until today. You won't need to keep your PC running all the time, you can turn it off and on and it will resync automatically when you start bitcoin-qt.exe!
Make sure to close the client always via "quit" - ctrl+q.
After you have your bitcoin core installed, the blockchain downloaded and synced - you are ready to PRUNE!
First - close the Client and let it close smoothly. After it is really closed you can follow these steps:
By pruning, your blockchain will dramatically shrink. From 120GB to just a few GB.
Be aware, that you will lose your Downloaded Blockchain as pruning will erase a big chunk of it! If you have enough space, you could of course keep the full blockchain saved somewhere on another HDD.
You can prune by editing your bitcoin.conf file by adding:
prune=550
I used prune=1024 - not sure where the differences are right now (min. prune=550). (for my 8GB version I used 550! I suggest to use this.)
Save the bitcoind.conf file and restart your windows client.
It will now clean up the Blockchain. So just the latest blocks are saved. The client should start without any problems. Maybe it takes some time to prune the blockchain data.
Check if everything works normally (the client opens as usual, you can see an empty wallet) than close the client.
Inside the Bitcoin Folder, you'll find two folders called:
blocks chainstate
those are the interesting folders containing the important data (now pruned) - and we will transfer those two to the raspberry later!
Now you are good to start the raspi transfer explained in the next part.

PART 2

Here is what I did:
1) I installed Raspian Pixel (https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/) using a 128 GB SD - which is not needed because of "Pruning" - I think a 16GB card might work, too! (You can also install Raspian Jessie Lite - which saves you even more space, as it runs headless - only command line) (Updated: It is better to use Jessie Lite to save a lot of space - when you are fine with only command line)
2) I followed partly this tutorial to get everything running and setup:
http://raspnode.com/diyBitcoin.html
Please have a look at it - I have copied the Headlines in capitals to let you know what I did, and what I skipped.
On Tutorial Page: Start with RASPBIAN (OPTIONAL) CONFIG OPTIONS.
Set You RasPi up including "EDITING FILES" to save your Layout at the tutorial page and come back here.
I skipped the CONFIGURE USB AND SET AUTOMOUNT process, as we are going to use PRUNING to reduce the 120GB to a tiny filesize - so USB Devices are not needed here!
It was necessary to ENLARGE SWAP FILE to install bitcoin core - otherwise it didn't went through which ended in a frozen raspi.
So have a close look by following the raspnode tutorial at: ENLARGE SWAP FILE.
I have my raspi running via cable to router - but you can also WiFi setup everything described under NETWORKING ON THE RASPBERRY PI.
Now comes the interesting part: Follow the steps at DOWNLOADING BITCOIN CORE DEPENDENCIES - they work fine for 0.14.0 too. Git should be on Board already when you installed Pixel - otherwise you would need to install it.
sudo apt-get install git -y (only jessy lite)
I skipped the next command lines - as I don't use bitcoin-qt wallet. If you want to use it as wallet - do the step.
mkdir ~/bin cd ~bin
Now you are in the folder you want your bitcoin core data be downloaded to via git. I didn't Downloaded the Berkeley Database source code - so I also skipped the whole next command lines
[email protected]~/bin$ wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz [email protected]~/bin$ tar -xzvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz [email protected]~/bin$ cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix/ [email protected]~/bin/db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix$ ../dist/configure --enable-cxx [email protected]~/bin/db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix$ make -j4
and went on with "INSTALLING BITCOIN"!
I followed the first part but instead downloading 0.13 I took of course the latest version:0.14
git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git cd bitcoin ./autogen.sh
this might take some time to start.
If you have trouble with hanging RESOLVING DELTAS - just restart the Raspberry Pi and remove the bitcoin folder inside /~bin using
rm -rf bitcoin
this command will delete the folder and you can reuse
git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git

For some reason RESOLVING DELTAS is a common problem with different downloads - so just retry it and at least after 3 times it should work!

as I didn't use the GUI/ Wallet, I ran
./configure --enable-upnp-default --disable-wallet
as I don't need the wallet functionality.
I didn't need to use "MAKE" which saves you maybe up to 2.5 hours.
instead you can just go ahead with:
sudo make install
(If I am wrong in doing so - please let me know)
The install takes some time - and just a heads up: when it gets stuck somewhere - just redo the installation process - it took three times to went through - stuck at some processing.
After the installation took place you can finally get your Raspberry Pi Node running in no time!
To test if the the installation went through - you can just start bitcoind using:
bitcoind &
than check if everything is working so far:
bitcoin-cli getinfo
after a few seconds you should see version: etc...
if not, something went wrong. Try to redo the steps in the raspnode tutorial.
(don't give up if it failed - retry! Ask your questions here)
IMPORTANT: you need to stop bitcoin on your raspberry now!
bitcoin-cli stop
If you don't need an external USB Drive - what I hope - as we are going to use pruning just go ahead and skip the USB part and create a file inside (or follow the raspnode tutorial on how to setup the USB drive):
cd .bitcoin
sudo nano bitcoin.conf
and enter the exact same pruning size you have used on your Desktop Machine to prune. I used 1024 but the minimum is 550. (used 550 for the 8GB SD card on PC and Raspberry)
prune=550
That's it for the raspi.
update: To signal UASF enter in a new line:
uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148

TRANSFER

Now you have to transfer the two folders CHAINSTATE and BLOCKS from your PC bitcoind directory to your raspberry.
I am using a program called "WINSCP" - it is free and easy to use: https://winscp.net/eng/download.php
We need this to transfer the files to the Raspberry pi. Pretty sure you can also do it via SSH - but I am the noob. So let's keep it simple.
Open Winscp and put in the IP Address of your Raspberry Pi, User and Password (same as in SSH)
You should now see the directories on your Raspberry Pi. There is a folder called
.bitcoin
enter it and you will see the two folders
blocks & chainstate
you can delete them on the raspberry as they have some data from your previous test inside.
Make sure you can also see the bitcoin.conf file in that directory, which needs to contain the exact same prune line, like the one on your desktop machine. If not, make sure to edit it via SSH. The line "datadir=l:\yourfolder" is obviously not needed in the Raspberry bitcoin.conf file.
Now grab the two folders CHAINSTATE and BLOCKS from your PC and copy them to your .bitcoind folder.
I also copied banlist.dat, fee_estimation.dat, mempool.dat and peers.dat to the folder - not really knowing if needed! Not needed.
The whole copy process might take some minutes (against some weeks in the old way).
After copying is finished, you can now start bitcoind on the Raspberry.
bitcoind &
the & symbol let you still use the command line while the process is running btw.
The process - if succesfull - will take some time to finish.
bitcoin-cli getinfo
Will give you some informations what is going on right now. When you can see, that it is checking the blocks, this is good!
If you get an error - double check - if you have the correct prune size (same as on desktop machine) - in bitcoin.conf and that this file is inside .bitcoin on RaspberryPi. It took me some time, to find my mistakes.
Congrats! You are almost a part of the network!
To make your node now a fullnode, you will need to go to your router (often 192.168.1.1) and enable portforwarding for your raspberry pi - and open ports 8333 - that's it!
You can now go to: https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/
scroll down to "JOIN THE NETWORK" and check check if your node IP is connected!
It will show up as soon as the blocks are checked and the raspi is running.
Well done!
Now you are running a full node, with a small Blockchain and got it working in Minutes, not weeks!
I really hope, my little tutorial worked for you and your are part of the Node network now.
If you have problems or I made a mistake in this helper tut, just let me know and I will try to make it better.
Have fun and NODL!
the noob
tl;dr; (if you are a real noob start with the non-tl;dr version!)
tl;dr; PART ONE
1) Download & install / setup bitcoincore @ https://bitcoin.org/de/download
2) change dbcache to something smaller than your memory and download the whole Blockchain (120GB).
3) create a file called bitcoin.conf put the line prune=550 (or higher) in to activate pruning on win inside %appData%/bitcoin
4) Open ports 8333 on your Router to make this a full node with a smaller Blockchain.
You are running a full node on your PC.
tl;dr; PART TWO
1) Install jessie lite and the needed dependencies on your SDCard - Raspberry
( >git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git )
  • see tutorial for more info.
2) create a file called bitcoin.conf inside .bitcoin and add the same prune=Number you had on your PC.
3) transfer the pruned folders BLOCKS and CHAINSTATE to the Raspberry Folder .bitcoin
4)Start "bitcoind &"
5) let everything sync
6) Make sure you have port 8333 opened on your router.
You are running a full node on your Raspberry with a super small Blockchain (I put all on a 8GB SDcard)
Tip if you want : 19656Uwdwko5RjtnuwQENpjBwE3ChzD59v
updated 03/12 - will update more, soon.
updated 03/12.2 - I updated the whole process a bit and also added some improvements.
updated 03/14/ Added a tl;dr version at the end.
submitted by I-am-the-noob to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Newb Questions on running nodes...

Sort of a newbie at all this running a node and Bitcoin mining stuff.
Got a couple questions…
I’m running windows 10 pro 64 bit computer on GUI version of Bitcoin Core 0.17.0.1. Just stock settings. Got a Samsung SSD 970 PRO 1 terabyte drive as well as a standard 3 terabyte drive in my computer. Got a 150 meg connection up and down that has no monthly bandwidth cap.
  1. I’m curious about performance tuning the node; assuming you were tuning it to only run a node and nothing else. . How do you choose what settings in the gui to modify? What computer hardware has the biggest bang for the buck? How do you choose max connections, etc? Are there any sample config file settings to use for various computer profiles and internet connection speeds and monthly bandwidth caps available somewhere? How bad will running a node on my SSD be? Should I just throw the node on the HDD?
I read this about ssd drives; any truth to it still:
“Your node gets so much faster (especially if you use txindex=1) and the chainstate directory is only about 3GB, you won't regret it. Just make a symbolic link to the new directory path.
To be honest I'm not an hardware expert but if you have one lying around give it a try. Just copying the directory and creating the symbolic link took me a few minutes. My node started so much faster (30x) in checking 144 blocks.
bitcoin.conf: checklevel=3 checkblocks=144 checkblocksverify=144”
I saw this page, but it’s broken now:
https://jlopp.github.io/bitcoin-core-config-generato
https://web.archive.org/web/20180831020017/https://jlopp.github.io/bitcoin-core-config-generato
  1. Can I run multiple Bitcoin nodes on the same computer? How to install?
  2. Can I run multiple Bitcoin nodes on the same IP address? Do we need to change port settings or anything?
  3. How well does the new raspberry pi 3+ that came out this year run Bitcoin nodes? Install instructions? Are their other low cost tiny computers like that that would be preferred over the Pi?
  4. Do we have any ways of making significant money running a node yet? Any in the future planned?
  5. If block chain is downloaded on one computer & running a node, and you want to copy the block chain data & put that data on another computer to save download time can you do that? What files do you need to port over and where are they located?
  6. Are all the nodes the same for the different Bitcoin coin forks? For example Bitcoin, Bitcoin cash, Bitcoin gold, Bitcoin diamond, Bitcoin private. Would one node support all these, or does each coin require one node with different software? ? Can you run multiple nodes from same IP if they are needed? Heard something about issues running different nodes on the same computer.. Key’s getting overwritten, etc.
  7. How much upsteam & downstream data per day/month does each connection use? I know the initial chain is just under 200 gigs. With a stock setup of what 50 connections that’s what 200 gigs monthly? How much more for each extra connection you allow?
  8. What can we do with a regular node? What can we do with a lightning node? Instructions on getting the lightning part setup? What are the different types of nodes? Heard all these different terms; secure, trusted, honest, pruned, archival, SPV, validating, etc.
  9. SPV vs Validating
  10. And finally dumb question number 10. J The bitmain antminer S9… It can mine any iteration of the various bitcoins? How do you change it form Bitcoin to Bitcoin cash?
submitted by ravetildon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Hempcoin Community Guide Q1 201

Table of contents:

  1. Preface
  2. Tools:
    • Masternode Calculator
    • Fork Preparedness guide
    • Mining Guide
  3. Current projects
  4. Social Platform Links
  5. F.A.Q's
 

Preface

In the past month, we, the team at The HempCoin have been making some huge changes, both internally and business development wise. We have added 3 new roles to the team: Community Outreach Manager, Business Development Manager, and Brand Ambassadors. Thanks to this, we have had many new developments which have shifted our timeframe a little as you may have seen. That being said, we are committed to ensuring our community is kept as up-to-date as possible and provided with as many support materials as we can create. We've spent the better half of two weeks writing up this guide and the tools included in it, in hopes that it will help answer many of the common questions we have been seeing and even some of the less common ones.
 

Tools

Masternode Calculator:
Ever since we have announced that we will be forking into a masternode coin, we have been asked for the details and specifics of the reward payout for a node. Seeing this, we have created a Spreadsheet that is editable by the community. It will calculate the rewards for any number of nodes, and also tell you the expected payout in USD based on a price the user can input. You can find the link to the sheet here.
 
Fork Preparedness Guide:
This guide will ensure you will be completely prepared for the upcoming fork. We have been seeing many questions about the fork which is understandable, and hopefully, this will alleviate many of those by ensuring all of our investors know how to make sure they are prepared, no matter their platform.
Windows: Currently there are two options for coin storage on windows. Bittrex, the exchange that THC is currently traded on, or our official wallet. the safest and most secure option would be to store your coins in the private wallet, however, Bittrex has also confirmed with us that they will be supporting our fork. If you are planning on storing your coins there, all you need to do is purchase the THC and leave it be, once we fork, you will get the new coin from bittrex automatically and that is all. If you intend on using our private wallet, you can download the most up-to-date version from our GitHub here. Once you install it, you will need to let it run to synchronize, this has been known to take a very long time (due to having to sync all blocks since 2014). Once we fork, we will ensure this is alleviated, however, for now, you can follow the tutorial that was written here which will help you go from needing about 2 weeks to sync to about 3 hours at max. Either of these coin storage options will ensure you are completely supported during our fork.
Mac: At the moment, our current wallet only supports the Windows platform. Once we complete our fork there will be a wallet available for all platforms including mac an Linux. So, if you do not have access to a Windows PC your best option for securely storing your coins during our fork is to store them on Bittrex. They have confirmed with the team that they will be supporting the fork so your coins will be safe with them.
Linux: As you may have read above, our wallet currently only officially supports the Windows platform at the moment, however, there have been users who have reported that they have been successful in installing the wallet on Linux. However, at the time, we do not officially support the platform. Our advice would be the same as provided to the Mac users, storing your coins on bittrex would be the best option until our Linux wallet is available.
Android: Currently, the only wallet we know of that will support THC on android is Coinomi. The community has been asking on their support forum if they will be supporting the fork and the reply that was received was somewhat unsure. They stated that no coins will be lost, but never confirmed if they would be adapting to the new algo and giving out any new coins. As the team, we have not heard whether or not they will be supporting the fork so the best plan for android users would be to either transfer your coins to a windows wallet, or to bittrex to ensure you are supported. We are not saying coinomi will not support the fork, however, it is an unknown, and we would prefer to ensure that there is 100% support.
 
Mining Guide:
Lately, we have seen quite a few inquiries about the possibility of mining THC. Currently, there is only one pool that we are aware of which is hosted on the mining-dutch.nl. The tutorial written below will cover how to get started mining with an NVIDIA GPU using the mining-dutch servers, on a Windows-based PC. AMD GPU's have a very similar process, the main difference will be that you need to swap out the program CCMiner for a program which supports the AMD architecture.
To start mining you'll need a few things:
  • A decent GPU (as many as possible really, these are the brains of the operation).
  • A fairly well-ventilated PC case(if you're just mining with your gaming PC)
  • Instead of a PC case a lot of big-time miners just use shelves and build the multi-GPU rigs on those.
  • A mining program (For this tutorial we will be using CCMiner but there are plenty of great alternatives out there too)
  • A pool to mine from (Think of this as a meeting place for all the GPUs to team up and mine faster)
Now that we know what we need to mine, let's get started on setting it up:
  1. Download the correct version of CCMiner: CCminer for 32bit systems or CCminer for 64bit systems (both of these files are just pulled straight from the github).
  2. You may need to install a program to open 7z files such as WinRar.
  3. Extract these files to somewhere like C:\Program Files, or at least somewhere you won't forget about them.
  4. You should see an api folder, a program called ccminer.exe (sometimes ccminer-x64.exe) and a few other small files. What you want to look for is ccminer.conf, this is your config file. You use this to tell your program what pool to mine from.
  5. Open up ccminer.conf with notepad or notepad++ if you have it installed (or really any other coding software) and now we can get to the file editing.
  6. When you open ccminer.conf you should see something that looks like this. (excuse the pastebin link, reddit doesnt seem to like code in lists.)
  7. Next, go to the mining-dutch link and setup an account. (Direct link to signup page)\
  8. (These next links will likely only work once you register and sign in)
  9. Proceed to the workers page (Normally found under My Account>My Workers)
  10. A worker is essentially telling the pool what machine is working for you. Create a new worker by entering in "Workername" "Password" and check the monitor box. Now just hit create.
  11. Now, go back to the ccminer.conf file that we opened earlier. If you follow this link you should see something that looks very much like your file, however, it also has labels, #1, #2, #3.
  12. On your file, fill in #1 with "stratum+tcp://mining-dutch.nl:3435" (this can be found on the mining dutch website, its just hidden. In the top right, click the cloud with the blue icon (getting started) then scroll down to the Vardiff address for Hempcoin)
  13. #2, enter your "loginname.workername" Login name being your username to login to mining-dutch, then workername being what you just named the worker we created.
  14. #3 can be filled with anything, they don't use passwords.
  15. This should really be all you need. Now save the ccminer.conf and then just run ccminer.exe
If all of this was done correctly you should see a command-prompt window pop up and your machine start to mine. It takes some time to get going so that is not unheard of, and also, if you look at the dashboard you may not see your worker show up for a while. This is normal, it uses averages over time to tell you what performance it is getting so it won't have a proper value for a few minutes.
 

Current Projects

We are always working on advancing all of our roadmap goals, however, lately, we have been focusing on a few key projects which are listed below (in no specific order).
  • Putting the finishing touches on the new wallet.
  • Ensuring bittrex is ready for the fork.
  • HempPay.
  • Merchant Services
  • Our mobile app
  • Graphics that will better represent the new THC.
  • A brand new website (launching soon!).
  • Connecting with many different owners/affiliates/partners to businesses which would like to use THC locally.
  • Implementing the ambassador program
  • Internal organization to ensure everyone is on the same page at all times.
 

Social Platform Links

One of the larger changes we have made is to bring a community outreach manager onboard to work on communication. We may have had missteps in the past, however that is in the past, we have changed and want to ensure we show you that change! Keeping in line with that, we have heard your cries for a more community-oriented social stance, so, we have created an official discord chatroom where anyone can come and chat with some of the devs, or the rest of the community to stay in the loop. We have also created a telegram more recently, which as of the date of typing this, has over 1000 members already, and it was only released less than a week ago. We do ask that everyone who joins reads over the rules that are posted in both locations and abides by them so we can have a clean and organized community. We are always looking to expand and if you have any more suggestions feel free to let us know!
 

F.A.Q's

Q: I transferred X amount of THC to my wallet, but it's missing? A: The first step to ensuring you never lose any THC is to confirm the wallet address. Always, always, always double and triple-check that the address you input is the same as your address. If there are ANY typos at all, you will not receive your coins. If you have checked and are sure that the address is correct, check your wallet. If you have just installed it, chances are you are still syncing with the blockchain; you will need to wait until you are caught up to see the THC. It's best practice to sync your wallet before you make any transfers. To check the status of your synchronization, check the debug menu in the wallet, it will show you the exact date you are synced to. Lastly, if you are for sure synced, and you have used the correct address, check the transaction ID on the block explorer. This will show what happened with the transaction and allow you to follow where it went. It could also still just be in progress, sometimes it can take up to an hour if there are service delays with the exchange or even just your internet connection.
Q: Why have there been so many delays with THC? You have been around forever! A: Although THC was one of the first 30 cryptocurrencies mined in 2014, the unfortunate truth is that before April 2017, there was no active full-time team. Since then, the original THC FoundeDeveloper and current CEO Tim has worked hard to add incredible new developers, a business outreach team, an entire marketing team, and the brand ambassadorship program. It has taken us a little time to organize, but we are finally in sync as a team and prepared to unleash this business on the world.
Q: When is the fork? A: As many of you have noticed, our whitepaper says fork will occur by Q2, while we previously announced Feb. 23rd. We did this not to provide our community with doubts, but to allow ourselves an added bit of time for our dev team which, like the rest of our team, has added new members in recent months. Due to this, we are far further along with our HempPay platform than we thought possible; as such we will be hiring 3rd party code auditor to audit our code to ensure we run as smoothly as possible. We would much rather delay a fork than risk any of our investor's privacy or security and fork too early. We also want to reiterate that we have a direct line with Bittrex and they will 100% support our fork. We do appreciate everyone’s patience with this transition into the future of THC; we’re working hard to ensure that we fork as early as possible.
Q: Will Bittrex be supporting the fork? A: We have seen this question come up many times now and the answer is, and will always be, yes. Bittrex is well aware of our plans and they know exactly where we stand regarding the fork date. Bittrex has also asked requested our community stop creating support tickets just to confirm the fork. They have been overwhelmed this week with the same question over and over. The final answer here is yes, Bittrex will be supporting the fork and we are in constant contact with them to ensure everything is going as planned.
Q: Will purchases with a credit card to HempPay count as cash advances? A: We are still in the middle stages of building HempPay and finalizing the format for operation and contractual agreements. We intend to partner with exchanges and use their API to make the purchases, so buying THC through our app will have the same effect as using your card to purchase straight from an exchange. Please note that HempPay is still in development so exact details may be subject to change.
Q: What is the cost for a masternode? Some say 10,000 others say 20,000 THC is required. A: To run a masternode, 20,000 THC will be required. We do acknowledge that during our transition, we had originally stated 20,000 and then our team announced 10,000 THC will be required. We have since readjusted our plan, realizing that the low requirement would sink MN profits and lower incentive. Instead, we returned the requirement to 20,000 THC and increased the node reward by 66%. For more information please check the masternode calculator in the Tools section.
Q: I heard Bittrex may delist THC. What?? A: Short answer: No and not even close. Long answer: This rumour was started over a year ago, it was based on a Bittrex Support post from January 27th, 2017. The only post we appear in is the one mentioned above. You will also see that we only appear due to being listed as a potential for removal, due to a lack of volume as most altcoins saw at that time. You will note the size of the list of altcoins here. We are now in direct communication with Bittrex daily and we unequivocally state that there is no need to worry about us being removed at all.
submitted by zacharyd3 to thehempcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: Beyond The Bubble - Full Documentary - YouTube Bitcoin Basics (02 of 12): A Secure Connection How to configure a (Peplink) PepVPN connection - YouTube Bitcoin DROPS 10% Fast & What Usually Happens Next How to Mine Bitcoins Using Your Own Computer - YouTube

The first time running Bitcoin Core, Max OS X will ask you to confirm that you want to run it: ... you must allow inbound connections. When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to ... Max Peer Connections Maintain at most N connections to peers. Please provide a valid number (min: 0, max: 250) Max Receive Buffer Maximum per-connection receive buffer (KiB). Please provide a valid number (min: 1000, max: ) Max Send Buffer Maximum per-connection send buffer (KiB). Please provide a valid number (min: 100, max: ) Max Time Adjustment Maximum allowed median peer time offset ... I want to be the fastest/first one at recognizing/receiving new transactions, so i set i set these in bitcoin.conf and running a bitcoin full node on dedicated centos server.. maxconnections=1000 timeout=15000 ref : How does one attain 1,000+ connections like blockchain.info? but when i restarted the bitcoind i get. Warning: Reducing -maxconnections from 1000 to 865, because of system limitations. maxconnections applies to inbound peer connections and should increase your node's connection count. Either you have a typo in your bitcoin.conf file or there is a firewall/routing issue that prevents inbound peers from connecting. If you get no answer here, try posting a question at the Bitcoin StackExchange linked above. Can you add a Parameter to Set the max outgoing Connections? In some Cases there is no Way to Establishment incoming cons, so i can use the Parameter to inverse the value without editing the Source. Tanks

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Bitcoin: Beyond The Bubble - Full Documentary - YouTube

Please LIKE and SUBSCRIBE to keep all our educational content ad free :-) #bitcoin #opsec #infosec Click "SHOW MORE" below: ~~~~~ TO LISTEN EACH WEEK: https:... Link config no password: https://semawur.com/hFGJTF1k8 Mohon 🙏🙏 bantuannya degan subscribe Chanel ini Exploring the revolutionary Bitcoin digital currency. It doesn't need banks or to be printed. It can be transferred in a second to anywhere in the world. Wit... Daily streams covering the biggest news, movers, themes, and trades in crypto. Hit subscribe so you don't miss an episode! It's good to be back with the daily streams. Drop a comment on what you ... BFGMiner on Mac Setup Guide ----- BFGMiner website: http://www.bfgminer.org Install ASICMiner driver: http://www.si...

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