Bitcoin: Migrate away from Armory Wallet · GitHub

Moronic Monday: Ask all your bitcoin questions!

You know how it works! But if for some reason you don't, here's how it works:
submitted by cam51037 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Cold storage help

Hi guys, i placed around 3 bitcoins in my armory cold storage on my laptop a few years ago. I have access to the private key, passphrase, what would be the quickest possible solution to remove these coins from cold storage?
I have tried opening up the armory however it says its offline and not connected to the internet
I have bitcoin core downloading at the moment however its extremely slow, help please
submitted by BroadReturn to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Armory, got BTC deposited into my wallet but it is OFFLINE, NEED HELP GETTING IT ONLINE!!!!

as the title said, i got a deposit into my bitcoin armory wallet, and its offline, i think cold storage is the word used. I am looking for help getting it back online as i am not a computer guy in the slightest. its all very very new and scary to me, ive moved it to my D:/ drive for more space, did the little that I could. I would greatly appreciate any help and figured this is the place to do it. Ive found out the company is dissolved and it is maintained by the community so i figured why not come to the biggest community in the world!
submitted by Burdmayne23 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

how do i sweep armory private keys into the new BCH app from bitcoin.com?

Hey! so i have my armory private keys and the new app...but i cant see where to enter them?
Thanks for any help!
submitted by wizzyting to btc [link] [comments]

Armory Wallet Has Failed Me! Can I recover BTC?

So I opted to migrate from coinbase to a local wallet.
Naturally, I download Armory and shoot it a send for 1BTC. 225 confirmations on the SEND, but wallet never receives it.
Turns out, running Armory wallet has been corrupting my database. Every time I run it a background process it spawns causes Bitcoin-QT to fail.
I've tried uninstalling and re-installing bitcoin, armory wallet three times. I've deleted my bitcoin directory in %appdata%, ensured downloads are never interrupted.
Is there any way at all for me to recover the BitCoin I sent to armory wallet provided I can never get armory wallet to work correctly?
Any help appreciated. Here is the errors:
2015-08-21 14:48:15 init message: Activating best chain... 2015-08-21 14:49:23 Corruption: block checksum mismatch 2015-08-21 14:49:23 *** System error while flushing: Database corrupted
submitted by andhof-mt to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help redeeming gift from 2014

Back in 2014 a stranger gifted me a paper for the Secret Santa. It has a picture of a 10$ bill on a background of a render of bitcoin "bills" and "coins". In that paper there are:
At the time I put some effort into it, but couldn't figure out how to redeem it, and since I didn't know the sender I couldn't ask him, so I let it be. With the recent bitcoin craze I decided it was worth giving it another shot to see if I can use whatever funds there are as an excuse to learn how all this works.
I've read quite a bit, watched a few youtube videos, installed bitcoincore and my computer maintains a core now. I also created a wallet with Armory. Still, I haven't been able to access the address. When I try to sweep it in Armory by inputting the private key I get the following error:
There was an error processing the private key data. Please check that you entered it correctly.
I'm guessing either the account doesn't actually exist or (most probably) the codes I have are shorthand, compressed, or something of the like that I just don't get.
If you are willing to help, I'll greatly appreciate it. I believe I have given all the information that I have, with the obvious exception of the keys. Ask me if there's any other necessary detail I may have missed to report though!
submitted by markmycoin to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

This obviously isn't reaching anyone

This obviously isn't reaching anyone submitted by themusicgod1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Corrupted wallet.dat with 18 btc - Possible to restore bitcoins?

I have a wallet from yore, had 18 btc that got corrupted and I kind of just lost interest in bitcoins. Well now that 18 is woth $2K or so and I fired up a new bitcoin-qt wallet with that wallet.dat file to see if it would read it. Well it almost did.
The GUI read 18 unverified bitcoins at first, and as the blockchain neared completion, it verified every bitcoin. I was so excited. But then it crashed with a runaway exception "can't open database file wallet.dat -30974"
I get that error when I try to send a bitcoin too. Any chance of restoring this near-working wallet?
EDIT: Bitcoins have been recovered!!!!!!! The final solution was provided by musicbunny, to which I am extremely greatful for his out-of-the box solution. I think pywallet suggested by eof would have done the trick too. The keys probably could have been extracted, but I was running into trouble with my version of Python. Maybe it needed Python 2?
submitted by bitbeast to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help Understanding Hex & keys please - help with a term paper

Hello to all and thanks for having me in your community. Got to admit until today i had not really heard of Bitcoin except on the news here and there.
I have to write a term paper on "innovation" and decided since i knew nothing about bitcoin, i would use that. I get to learn while trying to explain.
What i am trying to make sense of is the addresses and how the private key's system makes them safe. I read the following.
( Nearly every 256-bit number is a valid private key. Specifically, any 256-bit number between 0x1 and 0xFFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFF FFFE BAAE DCE6 AF48 A03B BFD2 5E8C D036 4141 is a valid private key.
The range of valid private keys is governed by the secp256k1 ECDSA standard used by Bitcoin. )
What i am trying to understand is, does that mean that every hex from 63 0's with a 1 and the end, up to the hex listed above a valid private key for bitcoin. Or is that secp thing determine which hex's in that range are valid. Or is there a different valid range that i am missing.
I have already read that there are more valid bitcoin private keys than atoms in the universe. But what i would like to do for the paper is get some facts. Like every Hex between X & Y is a vaild bitcoin private key, which would take X amount of time to compute if you could generate X at a time.
The time frame thing is out there already, well not really, there are soo many different statements on it, hence why i want to know if there is a range, how do i find it so i can do some math myself to figure it out accurately. I would lose major points on the term paper for speculating so i need to back up my facts.
Thanks a bunch guys and gals.
submitted by BlockChainBandit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Validate private key

Hi! So I have an offline wallet where I store my funds. But this gives me a weird feeling because although I have the private key for the address I don't know if I can spend them. To be more precise: My fear (I'm paranoid, I know ;) ) is the following:
Imagine the case where I want to spend the coins, I enter my private key somewhere and one of the following errors happen and render the coins unspendable:
So my fear boils down to the following question:
is there a offline "transaction simulator" which takes necessary blockchain data (unspent outputs of the address), the private key and the receiving address to
a) generate a transaction
b) check it (the same way bitcoind does) for validity and if it could be included in a block
?
That way I could really check if I can spend the coins without doing so. Thanks!!
EDIT: Thanks for the replies so far! I know that I can re-generate the public address from the private key offline. But consider this private key:
5Km2kuu7vtFDPpxywn4u3NLu8iSdrqhxWT8tUKjeEXs2f9yxoWz
It's corresponding elliptic curve exponent is
ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
Which is an INVALID private key (see https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Private_key). Apparently, someone already sent coins to this address and someone emptied it. So it works. But this could be only one of the problems which could occur?
submitted by ColpColp to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Initial Armory Sync taking over 5 days now?? I have BTC stuck in Purgatory. Advice??

Hi everyone! I'm reaching out to reddit on this one, as I am a noob at bitcoin, the blockchain, and apparently choosing the appropriate wallets for my little and insignificant BTC transactions.
To start, this is my first transaction ever with BTC. I purchased funds from coinbase and sent them over to an Electrum wallet I had set up through the clearnet. I started reading forums and apparently went with some bad advice as to setting up a secondary wallet through tor and transferring my coin to it as a means to further anonymize my bitcoin. It was then also recommended that I use Armory as they have a reputation for being secure.
So this I did. I set up a secondary Armory wallet over tor (which later found out isn't very secure at all, depending on who controls those exit nodes) and then foolishly initiated a transfer prior to even beginning the ledger download, ridiculously long initialization process I was soon to find out needed to be done/should have been done beforehand. I obviously am now eating crow for not being nearly as versed on or prepared for this transaction before jumping in, nose first.
Ok so now my questions are these... My OS (with good CPU, 4 gb RAM, excellent bandwidth) has been in the verification process for going on 5 days now and currently at 83% of the Initializing Bitcoin Engine phase. I've only been creeping at maybe a 3% gain per day. Is this bc I set up the wallet through tor? Is there any fix that I can use to speed this up? Also, will my coin even be available anymore and show up in my wallet if and when I finally do get back online??
Obviously I'm feeling most idiotic at the moment for this and I really appreciate ANY advice I can be given on the subject. I'm now aware that I should have never gone with such a heavy wallet for my small-time bitcoin to begin with. But I just don't know where to go from here. Thanks for reading guys...
submitted by Thundergun22 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Just bought first coin, using Armory and have some questions

I've just bought 1BTC and this is my first foray into the world of online currencies, so please excuse this question. I transferred by 1BTC to an Armory wallet. I didn't realise however that Armory needs to download an enormous blockchain which will -quite literally- take weeks. Do I need to wait for this to happen before I can access my 1BTC? I'd like to transfer it to Electrum.
submitted by ghbdg to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is a Cryptocurrency Wallet?

What is a Cryptocurrency Wallet?
Use this straightforward guide to learn what a cryptocurrency wallet is, how they work and discover which ones are the best on the market.
A cryptocurrency wallet is a software program that stores private and public keys and interacts with various blockchain to enable users to send and receive digital currency and monitor their balance. If you want to use Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency, you will need to have a digital wallet.
How do they work?
Millions of people use cryptocurrency wallets, but there is considerable misunderstanding about how they work. Unlike traditional ‘pocket’ wallets, digital wallets don’t store currency. In fact, currencies don’t get stored in any single location or exist anywhere in any physical form. All that exists are records of transactions stored on the blockchain.
Cryptocurrency wallets are software programs that store your public and private keys and interface with various blockchain so users can monitor their balance, send money and conduct other operations. When a person sends you bitcoins or any other type of digital currency, they are essentially signing off ownership of the coins to your wallet’s address. To be able to spend those coins and unlock the funds, the private key stored in your wallet must match the public address the currency is assigned to. If public and private keys match, the balance in your digital wallet will increase, and the senders will decrease accordingly. There is no actual exchange of real coins. The transaction is signified merely by a transaction record on the blockchain and a change in balance in your cryptocurrency wallet.
What are the different types of Cryptocurrencywallets?
There are several types of wallets that provide different ways to store and access your digital currency. Wallets can be broken down into three distinct categories – software, hardware, and paper. Software wallets can be a desktop, mobile or online.
Are Cryptocurrency wallets secure?
Wallets are secure to varying degrees. The level of security depends on the type of wallet you use (desktop, mobile, online, paper, hardware) and the service provider. A web server is an intrinsically riskier environment to keep your currency compared to offline. Online wallets can expose users to possible vulnerabilities in the wallet platform which can be exploited by hackers to steal your funds. Offline wallets, on the other hand, cannot be hacked because they simply aren’t connected to an online network and don’t rely on a third party for security.
Although online wallets have proven the most vulnerable and prone to hacking attacks, diligent security precautions need to be implemented and followed when using any wallet. Remember that no matter which wallet you use, losing your private keys will lead you to lose your money. Similarly, if your wallet gets hacked, or you send money to a scammer, there is no way to reclaim lost currency or reverse the transaction. You must take precautions and be very careful!
Although Bitcoin is by far the most well-known and popular digital currency, hundreds of newcryptocurrencies (referred to as altcoins) have emerged, each with distinctive ecosystems and infrastructure. If you’re interested in using a variety of cryptocurrencies, the good news is, you don’t need set up a separate wallet for each currency. Instead of using a cryptocurrency wallet that supports a single currency, it may be more convenient to set up a multi-currency wallet which enables you to use several currencies from the same wallet.
Are there any transaction fees?
There is no straightforward answer here.
In general, transaction fees are a tiny fraction of traditional bank fees. Sometimes fees need to be paid for certain types of transactions to network miners as a processing fee, while some transactions don’t have any fee at all. It’s also possible to set your own fee. As a guide, the median transaction size of 226 bytes would result in a fee of 18,080 satoshis or $0.12. In some cases, if you choose to set a low fee, your transaction may get low priority, and you might have to wait hours or even days for the transaction to get confirmed. If you need your transaction completed and confirmed promptly, then you might need to increase the amount you’re willing to pay. Whatever wallet you end up using, transaction fees are not something you should worry about. You will either pay minuscule transaction fees, choose your own fees or pay no fees at all. A definite improvement from the past!
Are cryptocurrency wallets anonymous?
Kind of, but not really. Wallets are pseudonymous. While wallets aren’t tied to the actual identity of a user, all transactions are stored publicly and permanently on the blockchain. Your name or personal street address won’t be there, but data like your wallet address could be traced to your identity in a number of ways. While there are efforts underway to make anonymity and privacy easier to achieve, there are obvious downsides to full anonymity. Check out the DarkWallet project that is looking to beef up privacy and anonymity through stealth addresses and coin mixing.
Which Cryptocurrency wallet is the best?
There is an ever-growing list of options. Before picking a wallet, you should, however, consider how you intend to use it.
Bread Wallet
Bread Wallet is a simple mobile Bitcoin digital wallet that makes sending bitcoins as easy as sending an email. The wallet can be downloaded from the App Store or Google Play. Bread Wallet offers a standalone client, so there is no server to use when sending or receiving bitcoins. That means users can access their money and are in full control of their funds at all times. Overall, Bread Wallet’s clean interface, lightweight design and commitment to continually improve security, make the application safe, fast and a pleasure to use for both beginners and experienced users alike.
Mycelium
Advanced users searching for a Bitcoin mobile digital wallet, should look no further than mycelium. The Mycelium mobile wallet allows iPhone and Android users to send and receive bitcoins and keep complete control over bitcoins. No third party can freeze or lose your funds! With enterprise-level security superior to most other apps and features like cold storage and encrypted PDF backups, an integrated QR-code scanner, a local trading marketplace and secure chat amongst others, you can understand why Mycelium has long been regarded as one of the best wallets on the market.
Exodus
Exodus is a relatively new and unknown digital wallet that is currently only available on the desktop. It enables the storage and trading of Bitcoin, Ether, Litecoins, Dogecoins and Dash through an incredibly easy to use, intuitive and beautiful interface. Exodus also offers a very simple guide to backup your wallet. One of the great things about Exodus is that it has a built-in shapeshift exchange that allows users to trade altcoins for bitcoins and vice versa without leaving the wallet.
Copay
Created by Bitpay, Copay is one of the best digital wallets on the market. If you’re looking for convenience, Copay is easily accessed through a user-friendly interface on desktop, mobile or online. One of the best things about Copay is that it’s a multi-signature wallet so friends or business partners can share funds. Overall, Copay has something for everyone. It’s simple enough for entry-level users but has plenty of additional geeky features that will impress more experienced players as well.
Jaxx
Jaxx is a multi-currency Ether, Ether Classic, Dash, DAO, Litecoin, REP, Zcash, Rootstock, Bitcoin wallet and user interface. Jaxx has been designed to deliver a smooth Bitcoin and Ethereum experience. It is available on a variety of platforms and devices (Windows, Linux, Chrome, Firefox, OSX, Android mobile & tablet, iOS mobile & tablet) and connects with websites through Firefox and Chrome extensions. Jaxx allows in wallet conversion between Bitcoin, Ether and DAO tokens via Shapeshift and the import of Ethereum paper wallets. With an array of features and the continual integration of new currencies, Jaxx is an excellent choice for those who require a multi-currency wallet.
Armory
Armory is an open source Bitcoin desktop wallet perfect for experienced users that place emphasis on security. Some of Armory’s features include cold storage, multi-signature transactions, one-time printable backups, multiple wallets interface, GPU-resistant wallet encryption, key importing, key sweeping and more. Although Armory takes a little while to understand and use to it’s full potential, it’s a great option for more tech-savvy bitcoiners looking to keep their funds safe and secure.
Trezor is a hardware Bitcoin wallet that is ideal for storing large amounts of bitcoins. Trezor cannot be infected by malware and never exposes your private keys which make it as safe as holding traditional paper money. Trezor is open source and transparent, with all technical decisions benefiting from wider community consultation. It’s easy to use, has an intuitive interface and is Windows, OS X and Linux friendly. One of the few downsides of the Trezor wallet is that it must be with you to send bitcoins. This, therefore, makes Trezor best for inactive savers, investors or people who want to keep large amounts of Bitcoin highly secure.
Ledger Nano
The Ledger Wallet Nano is a new hierarchical deterministic multisig hardware wallet for bitcoin users that aims to eliminate a number of attack vectors through the use of a second security layer. This tech-heavy description does not mean much to the average consumer, though, which is why I am going to explain it in plain language, describing what makes the Ledger Wallet Nano tick. In terms of hardware, the Ledger Wallet Nano is a compact USB device based on a smart card. It is roughly the size of a small flash drive, measuring 39 x 13 x 4mm (1.53 x 0.51 x 0.16in) and weighing in at just 5.9g.
Pros:
Cons:
Green Address
Green Address is a user-friendly Bitcoin wallet that’s an excellent choice for beginners. Green Address is accessible via desktop, online or mobile with apps available for Chrome, iOS, and Android. Features include multi-signature addresses & two-factor authentications for enhanced security, paper wallet backup, and instant transaction confirmation. A downside is that Green Address is required to approve all payments, so you do not have full control over your spending
Blockchain (dot) info
Blockchain is one of the most popular Bitcoin wallets. Accessing this wallet can be done from any browser or smartphone. Blockchain.info provides two different additional layers. For the browser version, users can enable two-factor authentication, while mobile users can activate a pin code requirement every time the wallet application is opened. Although your wallet will be stored online and all transactions will need to go through the company’s servers, Blockchain.info does not have access to your private keys. Overall, this is a well-established company that is trusted throughout the Bitcoin community and makes for a solid wallet to keep your currency.
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

The First-generation Terminal — MoonBot

The First-generation Terminal — MoonBot

Moonbot
Our team has developed and is supporting the trading terminal MoonBot which was introduced in October 3, 2017. Currently, the performance of MoonBot surpasses that of most existing trading systems as a result of its advanced functionality and the high security features designed to protect your trading activities.
Secure Connection to the Exchange
The connection from MoonBot to an Exchange is carried out using special keys that the user receives from an exchange such as Binance or Bittrex.
MoonBot connects securely to cryptocurrency trading Exchanges through two special keys which are uniquely and only known to their owner. These are the API key, and the Secret key, both of which the users receives directly from the Exchange.
The MoonBot terminal then receives data and information from the exchange’s API collected at several different access levels, including:
Public information (publicly accessible data related to trading in general):
  • charts;
  • quotes;
  • orderbook;
  • real-time executed orders.
  • Authenticated information (unique to the users and which requires authentication access using the special keys): personal account status (wallet balances);
  • user transactions (such as the details of executed trades).
After receiving the various data information from the exchange, the terminal records these data in a local database for further processing and application.
Security Systems
The MoonBot terminal provides completely private storage of all your personal data!
The MoonBot team has absolutely no access to personal data, you are the only one controlling its security and have complete control over access to your details.
The MoonBot team are not able to withdraw, nor to move, any funds from your personal Exchange account or wallet.
You can therefore safely use the terminal for trading, receiving public information from the Exchange, and should you wish to share with others, the trading data on your account.
You therefore are the only person with control and access to your Exchange wallet, and can be completely assured of the absolute security of your private funds.
Lightning-fast Execution of the Orders on the Exchange and Order Status Update
Depending on the distance of the user from the exchange servers, the delay in order execution should not exceed 1 second. Theoretically, the delay can be reduced to a minimum intangible — 10–20 ms. Below is presented a very short extract(4 seconds in total) of the MoonBot log text file with brief explanations and highlights of the key features.

The MoonBot log text file with brief explanations and highlights of the key features.

Tick Chart. Display of All Orders on the Chart
Thanks to the API connection to the exchange, the terminal receives stream data of all filled orders on the exchange as soon as they were processed by the exchange servers and immediately displays them on the chart.
Tick Chart.
Thus, the visualization of the current state of the market is provided in real time with an accuracy of tens of milliseconds and as detailed as displaying each order on the chart.

Auto Trading on Signals
Fully automatic processing and trading off Telegram signals as well as parced TradingView alerts.

https://preview.redd.it/rw6im5wl1m931.png?width=1095&format=png&auto=webp&s=0ce7e7287dae27a0a71970083435fa93e592e5b5
Automatic Detection of Market Conditions and Reaction to its Changes
Thanks to streaming data acquisition, the terminal monitors all available markets simultaneously, and is therefore able to react almost instantaneously as favorable trading possibilities are presented. And due to the minimal delay in the execution of orders, MoonBot responds to abnormal changes almost instantly.

Advanced Orders. Stop Loss, Take Profit, Trailing Stop
OCO orders (one cancels the other) are one of the most sought-after functions from both the Exchanges providing liquidity to the markets, and applications running on top of the exchanges. The modern Trader cannot trade without the basic “smart” functions and addons to traditional exchange orders and considers them to be the minimum necessary set in their armory.

https://preview.redd.it/3gsh12b42m931.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=7f21bd7e7505f9bb5a95555cf355bb6f1f5efab4
Stop Loss
One of the most important tools for Traders is to be able to place orders whilst practicing safe money management in order to mitigate against losses. One of the most important safety tools is to use a Stop Loss, which is especially important in volatile, low liquidity markets.
With MoonBot, the user can set a Stop Loss threshold (either as a percentage of the order price, or as a number of price points), which their strategy can accept should the price move in the opposite direction to that expected. When this threshold value has been reached, the order will be closed automatically.
Technically, a Stop Loss can be set up in two ways: either as a stop-limit order placed directly on the exchange at the same time as the initial position is opened; or as a function controlled in real-time by the MoonBot terminal itself. Additional types of conditional Stop Loss functions include:
  1. Additional and conditional Stop Losses – these are activated by a timer, and depend on the price reached. Thus Moonbot can raise the Stop Loss to a break-even point, or can be set to move upward to follow coin growth and to achieve higher profitability.
  2. BV/SV Ratio Stop Loss — this is a measure of buying/selling pressure and depends on the ratio of the volume of coin purchases compared against sales over a given time range. For example, if the number of sales exceeds the number of purchases, then this Stop Loss would be activated
  3. V-STOP — this is a stop which depends on the volume in the orderbook, where a price and volume level is set, which if broken will activate the Stop Loss.
  4. Trailing Stop — Trailing Stop is a General Stop Loss Management Tool. This very important feature allows the Trader to maximize profit in an automatic mode by following upward price movements, until the price reverses by a preset amount. At that stage the Stop Loss is activated.
    Take Profit
The Trader can fix the profit gained as the value of an asset increases in several ways:
  • By closing the position after a predefined profit percentage has been reached.
  • By remaining in the position, and setting the Stop Loss level to break-even, or to higher profit levels.

Algorithmic Trading
At the moment, MoonBot has 13 types of strategies in-built (manual) using specific and well-proven algorithms (algorithmic trading or algo-trading).
Together these have more than 200 adjustable parameters that can be adjusted to optimize their profitability across the wide range of trending and ranging markets that occur.
https://preview.redd.it/rgm2d6z13m931.png?width=1084&format=png&auto=webp&s=521830b9386e2890620ace5d829f53c3a76ceeb3
Trusted Management
MoonBot includes a successful and well-tested Trusted Management feature, in other words — Copy Trading:
  • All trade actions from the Master Terminal are repeated on the Follower’s Terminal (slave terminal).
  • The Follower’s deposit remains securely in their own personal exchange account.
  • The Trusted Management feature does not have direct access to money, or to direct trading on someone else’s account, but manages only its own Exchange orders, simultaneously broadcasting encrypted messages to Followers terminals containing all Master actions.

https://preview.redd.it/h8ak7b4g3m931.png?width=1023&format=png&auto=webp&s=caf33dad55ad6b51ed9f1e44316df9182b875eff
Trust Management is successfully implemented and used by members of our community. The statistics of those TM Traders who share their results can be reviewed on the website — stat.moon-bot.com on the RatingTM tab.
Community
During the two years of development of the MoonBot terminal, more than 30,000 copies have been registered and used by our Community of Traders.
Every day several thousand people trade cryptocurrencies using the MoonBot terminal, making daily approximately one hundred thousand manual and automatic transactions only on the leading crypto-currency exchange — Binance.
The existing community of traders is actively developing. The MoonBot project has its own active pages on popular social networks, in dedicated Telegram channels divided by topics, and also its own Trader’s forum available to subscribers.
Topics on the BitcoinTalk Forum
  • bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2234450.0
  • bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2234198.0
    Websites
  • moon-bot.com — the official site of the MoonBot.
  • forum.moon-bot.com — MoonBot forum.
  • stat.moon-bot.com — trade statistics of the community members, TOP-50.
    Telegram Groups
  • t.me/moon_bot_crypto — the main RU-chat for communication.
  • t.me/Moon_Bot_Public — main ENG chat for communication and support.
  • t.me/MoonBotSettings — RU technical support chat.
  • t.me/moon_bot_kurilka — general RU chat.
    Telegram Channel
t.me/MoonBotNews — the latest news and updates.
Social Network
www.facebook.com/MoonBotTerminal
The current Support team is actively assisting users and resolving their issues through dedicated Telegram channels.
submitted by MoonTrader_io to Moontrader_official [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

What Is Multisig (and Why You Absolutely Need It)

It’s every Bitcoin user’s nightmare. You try to be careful and cautious with your Bitcoin wallet, but then you lose everything. It could be the result of a hacked device or a phishing attack. Or a corrupt hard drive, a lost phone, or a misplaced printout. Either way, you’ve lost access to your wallet and all your hard earned Bitcoin along with it.
Luckily, this problem can be avoided with Multisig. And by the time you’re finished reading this article, you will know everything you need to know about it.

The Problems of Single Signature (Singlesig) Authentication

Your Bitcoin wallet is essentially just an address to which all your Bitcoin is assigned. To be able to use the funds on a Bitcoin address you need to know two things. The first is its public address. The second is the private key that gives you access to the funds on that address.
The public address is akin to a bank account number. It’s called a “public” address, because you can share it with anyone. If you want someone to send you Bitcoin to your wallet, you need to give them its public address.
On the other hand, your private key is akin to a password. It's something you want to keep a secret, because its gives anyone possessing it full access to your funds. Unlike a conventional password, you don’t create your public key. It’s instead generated using advanced cryptography. You also don't keep it in your head, but instead store it on a computer, a smartphone, or a hardware wallet. Lastly, unlike a password, your private key is inseparably tied to your address. So there is no way for you to change it in case it gets compromised or recover it if it is lost.
So when you lose your private key, you lose all the Bitcoin in your wallet without any chance of recovery. Likewise, if a hacker or a phisher were to get a hold of your private key, they’d have full reign of your Bitcoin wallet.

Multisig I: Personal Security

This is where the simple, yet elegant solution called Multisig comes in. A Multisig address also consists of a single public address, but it has several private keys instead of one. When you create it, you choose the amount of private keys you want to generate. You also choose the number of keys needed to authenticate a transaction.
When creating a Multisig address, most people elect to use a simple 2/3 setup. This means that the address has a total of 3 private keys and that 2 of those 3 keys are needed to validate a transaction. Key one is your main key, which you can keep on your phone or other device. The second key you will usually give to an authenticator service (many of these work similarly to Google Authenticator). The third key is your backup key. This one is best kept in a safe place, such as a safety deposit box.
In this setup, to make a transaction, two of the three keys are needed. This solution is as brilliant as it is simple. It solves the vast majority of problem scenarios with private keys:

Multisig II: Jointly-Owned Wallets

In addition to private use, Multisig is also great for jointly-owned wallets. In a joint-user setup, each user is given a private key. During the creation of the address, the group agrees on the rules of how many key holders need to sign off on a transaction to authenticate it. This allows many people to own an address while eliminating the risk of the money being used without the consent of other key holders.
Multisig addresses can be set up to require the consent of all of the key holders or a certain percentage of them.
An all-consent setup is good for such uses as the joint address of a family. Before a transaction can go through, both spouses need to agree on it. This way, neither partner can make an important purchasing decision without the approval of the second one.
The second scenario allows for the creation of an in-built voting system. This is great for business and joint investment use. For example, there could be 9 key holders, and the majority of 5 keys could be needed to authenticate a transaction.

3 Recommended Bitcoin Wallets with Multisig Support:

There are many ways of setting up a Multisig address. As a starting point, our experts recommend trying out the following three Bitcoin clients with Multisig features:
Ready to setup your first Multisig wallet? We've got you covered! Check out the dedicated article in our FAQ on How to Setup a Multisig Wallet and create yours today!

https://wunderbit.co/blog/what-is-multisig-and-why-you-absolutely-need-it
submitted by wunderbit_co to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Secure paper wallet tutorial

This is my handout for paranoid people who want a way to store bitcoin safely. It requires a little work, but this is the method I use because it should be resistant to risks associated with:
  1. Bad random number generators
  2. Malicious or flawed software
  3. Hacked computers
If you want a method that is less secure but easier, skip to the bottom of this post.
The Secure Method
  1. Download bitaddress.org. (Try going to the website and pressing "ctrl+s")
  2. Put the bitaddress.org file on a computer with an operating system that has not interacted with the internet much or at all. The computer should not be hooked up to the internet when you do this. You could put the bitaddress file on a USB stick, and then turn off your computer, unplug the internet, and boot it up using a boot-from-CD copy of linux (Ubuntu or Mint for example). This prevents any mal-ware you may have accumulated from running and capturing your keystrokes. I use an old android smart phone that I have done a factory reset on. It has no sim-card and does not have the password to my home wifi. Also the phone wifi is turned off. If you are using a fresh operating system, and do not have a connection to the internet, then your private key will probably not escape the computer.
  3. Roll a die 62 times and write down the sequence of numbers. This gives you 2160 possible outcomes, which is the maximum that Bitcoin supports.
  4. Run bitaddress.org from your offline computer. Input the sequence of numbers from the die rolls into the "Brain Wallet" tab. By providing your own source of randomness, you do not have to worry that the random number generator used by your computer is too weak. I'm looking at you, NSA ಠ_ಠ
  5. Brain Wallet tab creates a private key and address.
  6. Write down the address and private key by hand or print them on a dumb printer. (Dumb printer means not the one at your office with the hard drive. Maybe not the 4 in 1 printer that scans and faxes and makes waffles.) If you hand copy them you may want to hand copy more than one format. (WIF and HEX). If you are crazy and are storing your life savings in Bitcoin, and you hand copy the private key, do a double-check by typing the private key back into the tool on the "Wallet Details" tab and confirm that it recreates the same public address.
  7. Load your paper wallet by sending your bitcoin to the public address. You can do this as many times as you like.
  8. You can view the current balance of your paper wallet by typing the public address into the search box at blockchain.info
  9. If you are using an old cell phone or tablet do a factory reset when you are finished so that the memory of the private keys is destroyed. If you are using a computer with a boot-from-CD copy of linux, I think you can just power down the computer and the private keys will be gone. (Maybe someone can confirm for me that the private keys would not be able to be cached by bitaddress?)
  10. To spend your paper wallet, you will need to either create an offline transaction, or import the private key into a hot wallet. Creating an offline transaction is dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Importing to a client side wallet like Bitcoin-Qt, Electrum, MultiBit or Armory is a good idea. You can also import to an online wallet such as Blockchain.info or Coinbase.
Trusting bitaddress.org
The only thing you need bitaddress.org to do is to honestly convert the brainwallet passphrase into the corresponding private key and address. You can verify that it is doing this honestly by running several test passphrases through the copy of bitaddress that you plan on using, and several other brainwallet generators. For example, you could use the online version of bitaddress, and brainwallet and safepaperwallet and bitcoinpaperwallet. If you are fancy with the linux command line, you can also try "echo -n my_die_rolls | sha256sum". The linux operating system should reply with the same private key that bitaddress makes. This protects you from a malicious paper wallet generator.
Trusting your copy of bitaddress.org
Bitaddress publishes the sha1 hash of the bitaddress.org website at this location:
https://www.bitaddress.org/pgpsignedmsg.txt
The message is signed by the creator, pointbiz. I found his PGP fingerprint here:
https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org/issues/18
"527B 5C82 B1F6 B2DB 72A0 ECBF 8749 7B91 6397 4F5A"
With this fingerprint, you can authenticate the signed message, which gives you the hash of the current bitaddress.org file. Then you can hash your copy of the file and authenticate the file.
I do not have a way to authenticate the fingerprint itself, sorry. According to the website I linked to, git has cryptographic traceability that would enable a person to do some research and authenticate the fingerprint. If you want to go that far, knock yourself out. I think that the techniques described in this document do not really rely on bitaddress being un-corrupt. Anyway, how do we know pointbiz is a good guy? ;-)
There are a lot of skilled eyes watching bitaddress.org and the signed sha1 hash. To gain the most benefit from all of those eyes, it's probably worthwhile to check your copy by hashing it and comparing to the published hash.
"But we aren't supposed to use brainwallets"
You are not supposed to use brainwallets that have predictable passphrases. People think they are pretty clever about how they pick their passphrases, but a lot of bitcoins have been stolen because people tend to come up with similar ideas. If you let dice generate the passphrase, then it is totally random, and you just need to make sure to roll enough times.
How to avoid spending your life rolling dice
When I first started doing this, I rolled a die 62 times for each private key. This is not necessary. You can simply roll the die 62 times and keep the sequence of 62 numbers as a "seed". The first paper address you create would use "my die rolls-1" as the passphrase, the second would be "my die rolls-2" and so on. This is safe because SHA256 prevents any computable relationship between the resulting private key family.
Of course this has a certain bad security scenario -- if anyone obtains the seed they can reconstruct all of your paper wallets. So this is not for everyone! On the other hand, it also means that if you happen to lose one of your paper wallets, you could reconstruct it so long as you still had the seed.
One way to reduce this risk is to add an easy to remember password like this: "my die rolls-password-1".
If you prefer, you can use a technique called diceware to convert your die rolls to words that still contain the same quantity of entropy, but which could be easier to work with. I don't use diceware because it's another piece of software that I have to trust, and I'm just copy/pasting my high entropy seed, so I don't care about how ugly it is.
Why not input the dice as a Base 6 private key on the Wallet Details tab?
Two reasons. First of all, this option requires that you roll the die 99 times, but you do not get meaningful additional protection by rolling more than 62 times. Why roll more times if you don't have to? Second, I use the "high entropy seed" method to generate multiple private keys from the same die rolls. Using the Base 6 option would require rolling 99 times for every private key.
I'm a big nerd with exotic dice. How many times to roll?
Put this formula in Excel to get the number of times to roll: "=160*LOG(2,f)" where f = number of faces on the die. For example, you would roll a d16 40 times. By the way, somewhat unbelievably casino dice are more fair than ordinary dice
The "Change address" problem:
You should understand change addresses because some people have accidentally lost money by not understanding it.
Imagine your paper wallet is a 10 dollar bill. You use it to buy a candy bar. To do this you give the cashier the entire 10 dollar bill. They keep 1 dollar and give you 9 dollars back as change.
With Bitcoin, you have to explicitly say that you want 9 dollars back, and you have to provide an address where it should go to. If you just hand over the 10 dollar bill, and don't say you want 9 dollars back, then the miner who processes the transaction gives 1 dollar to the store and keeps the remainder themselves.
Wallet software like Bitcoin-Qt handles this automatically for you. They automatically make "change addresses" and they automatically construct transactions that make the change go to the change address.
There are three ways I know of that the change problem can bite you:
  1. You generate a raw transaction by hand, and screw up. If you are generating a transaction "by hand" with a raw transaction editor, you need to be extra careful that your outputs add up to the same number as your inputs. Otherwise, the very lucky miner who puts your transaction in a block will keep the difference.
  2. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the paper wallet. The change is not in the paper wallet. It is in a change address that the wallet software generated. That means that if you lose your wallet.dat file you will lose all the change. The paper wallet is empty.
  3. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the change address that the wallet software generated. If the transaction did not need to consume all of the "outputs" used to fund the paper wallet, then there could be some unspent outputs still located at the address of the paper wallet. If you destroyed the paper wallet, and destroyed the copy of the private key imported to the wallet software, then you could not access this money. (E.g. if you restored the software wallet from its seed, thinking all of the money was moved to the wallet-generated change addresses.)
For more on this, see here
The hot paper wallet problem
Your bitcoin in your paper wallet are secure, so long as the piece of paper is secure, until you go to spend it. When you spend it, you put the private key onto a computer that is connected to the internet. At this point you must regard your paper wallet address as hot because the computer you used may have been compromised. It now provides much less protection against theft of your coins. If you need the level of protection that a cold paper wallet provides, you need to create a new one and send your coins to it.
Destroying your paper wallet address
Do not destroy the only copy of a private key without verifying that there is no money at that address. Your client may have sent change to your paper wallet address without you realizing it. Your client may have not consumed all of the unspent outputs available at the paper wallet address. You can go to blockchain.info and type the public address into the search window to see the current balance. I don't bother destroying my used/empty paper wallet addresses. I just file them away.
Encrypting your private key
BIP 0038 describes a standardized way to encrypt your paper wallet private key. A normal paper wallet is vulnerable because if anyone sees the private key they can take the coins. The BIP38 protocol is even resistant to brute force attacks because it uses a memory intensive encryption algorithm called scrypt. If you want to encrypt your wallets using BIP38, I recommend that you use bitcoinpaperwallet because they will let you type in your own private key and will encrypt it for you. As with bitaddress, for high security you should only use a local copy of this website on a computer that will never get connected to the internet.
Splitting your private key
Another option for protecting the private key is to convert it into multiple fragments that must be brought together. This method allows you to store pieces of your key with separate people in separate locations. It can be set up so that you can reconstitute the private key when you have any 2 out of the 3 fragments. This technique is called Shamir's Secret Sharing. I have not tried this technique, but you may find it valuable. You could try using this website http://passguardian.com/ which will help you split up a key. As before, you should do this on an offline computer. Keep in mind if you use this service that you are trusting it to work properly. It would be good to find other independently created tools that could be used to validate the operation of passguardian. Personally, I would be nervous destroying the only copy of a private key and relying entirely on the fragments generated by the website.
Looks like Bitaddress has an implementation of Shamir's Secret Sharing now under the "Split Wallet" tab. However it would appear that you cannot provide your own key for this, so you would have to trust bitaddress.
Durable Media
Pay attention to the media you use to record your paper wallet. Some kinds of ink fade, some kinds of paper disintegrate. Moisture and heat are your enemies.
In addition to keeping copies of my paper wallet addresses I did the following:
  1. Order a set of numeric metal stamps. ($10)
  2. Buy a square galvanized steel outlet cover from the hardware store ($1)
  3. Buy a sledgehammer from the hardware store
  4. Write the die rolls on the steel plate using a sharpie
  5. Use the hammer to stamp the metal. Do all the 1's, then all the 2's etc. Please use eye protection, as metal stamp may emit sparks or fly unexpectedly across the garage. :-)
  6. Use nail polish remover to erase the sharpie
Electrum
If you trust electrum you might try running it on an offline computer, and having it generate a series of private keys from a seed. I don't have experience with this software, but it sounds like there are some slick possibilities there that could save you time if you are working with a lot of addresses.
Message to the downvoters
I would appreciate it if you would comment, so that I can learn from your opinion. Thanks!
The Easy Method
This method is probably suitable for small quantities of bitcoin. I would not trust it for life-altering sums of money.
  1. Download the bitaddress.org website to your hard drive.
  2. Close your browser
  3. Disconnect from the internet
  4. Open the bitaddress.org website from your hard drive.
  5. Print a paper wallet on your printer
  6. Close your browser
submitted by moral_agent to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

5 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets with User-Owned Private Keys

5 Best Cryptocurrency Wallets with User-Owned Private Keys

https://preview.redd.it/sycppf5jrhk31.png?width=1000&format=png&auto=webp&s=f4e3415322fb12f29319fbd8c22fa90d14ffebbb
All cryptocurrency transactions are based on the control of two important numbers: public and private keys. Public keys facilitate the transfer of crypto; private keys, their receipt. These keys are stored and secured through digital wallets, the software through which users have access to their digital assets.
There are two main models of cryptocurrency wallets: those that don’t allow users to control their private keys and those that do. The first model of wallets host users’ private keys on a centralized server, which facilitates transactions. In the second model, users hold their own private keys and are able to send and receive tokens without the consent of a third party.
So just how important is it to directly control your private keys? We’ll answer that question today, and review some of the best wallet options that allow you to do that.

Private keys: What they are and why they matter

Private keys are randomly generated secret numbers that link a user to particular cryptocurrency assets. Coins can be transferred to other blockchains only by accessing a wallet’s private keys. For this reason, it is extremely important to keep private keys secure and confidential. Matt Miller, a Bloomberg TV host, demonstrated this lesson to the world when he briefly showed his private key QR code on-air and had his funds immediately stolen.
In one model of wallet, a third-party retains control of the private keys. This model is typically described as the crypto version of a bank. The user is the owner of the funds but relies on the wallet’s server to execute transactions. However, this comparison fails to recognize key dangers inherent in third-party management of crypto funds.
Crypto wallets, like bank accounts and any other internet-connected account, are at risk of being hacked. Unlike banks, however, crypto projects are not legally obligated to refund account holders their funds in the case of a security breach. For this reason, keeping funds in a wallet for which you don’t control the private keys is significantly riskier than storing fiat currency in a bank.
User-owned private key wallets offer a much stronger option in terms of security. No one has control over your funds except you. That means that if someone hacks the server hosting your wallet, your funds are secure. It also means that you can’t have your funds stolen if the wallet’s leadership “loses” the private keys (yes, that has happened).
Always remember that private keys unlock full access to digital funds. Opting for wallets with user-owned private keys ensures that you maintain control over your funds and do not rely on a third party to make transactions. Here, we picked out some of the most trusted solutions that allow full user-control over private keys.

Coin Wallet

Coin Wallet is an excellent solution that allows you to directly conduct blockchain transactions and access tokens. You can export your private keys, and the wallet does not have access or oversight over your operations within the software.
Coin Wallet is suited to the needs of both beginners and professional crypto users. It comes as free software with simple and streamlined interfaces in both mobile and desktop versions. The wallet supports any ERC20 and ERC223 tokens, including Bitcoin, Litecoin, Dogecoin, Bitcoin Cash, EOS, Ripple, Stellar, and Ethereum.
Of all the wallets on the market, Coin Wallet offers one of the most exhaustive collections of coins. Currently, there are more than 20,000 supported cryptocurrencies. The app gets bonus points for convenience, providing two built-in exchanges: Changelly and ShapeShift.

Blockchain

In 2011, Blockchain wallet pioneered the niche of online wallets. It remains one of the market leaders in wallets offering user-controlled keys. Currently, the company has over 41M wallets and more than $200B in transactions have been made on it since its start.
The mobile app is available in multiple languages and offers a built-in exchange for fast trading. Interfaces are very easy to follow and intuitive. The major drawback of this veteran wallet is that it supports just 5 coins: Bitcoin (BTC), Ether (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH), Stellar (XLM), and USD PAX (PAX).

Exodus

Exodus comes as a download for desktop or mobile. In addition to giving you control of your private keys, it also allows you to export them, as well. Plus, as an extra security measure, it never stores private keys on the server.
This wallet may not suit the needs of all users, as there is no web version and English is the only supported language.
The app lists 100+ crypto coins and offers ShapeShift as a built-in exchange.

Armory

Armory wallet is a great choice for users who want a simple storage option for their crypto assets. It offers some offline functionality, as well as free cold storage. It also lets you back up private keys (a QR code) on paper or create a multi-signature wallet. The latter option is particularly useful for businesses.
A major drawback of this wallet is that it is the least user-friendly option. Users need to have some basic knowledge encryption and software set-up. In addition, sending digital assets with Armory is less convenient than competitors and it doesn’t offer any built-in exchanges.

Bitcoin Core

Launched by the Bitcoin project, Bitcoin Core has a simple interface and is compatible with Mac, Linux, and Windows. It allows users to check the full node of Bitcoin transactions, i.e. download the entire blockchain. Therefore, it might take some time to download the full blockchain and set up your wallet.
A drawback of Bitcoin Core is that it’s large: you must have at least 200GB free disk space for this software, and system requirements constantly increase as the full Bitcoin network node grows.
As its name suggests, Bitcoin Core supports only Bitcoin. If you plan on trading and using only Bitcoin, this wallet is a great choice. Because you keep the full node on your computer, you don’t need any third parties to verify transactions. Sending or receiving coins here is very simple, and you are directly connected to the full Bitcoin network node. The fees are decided on by user votes.
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Common Bitcoin Scams And How To Avoid Them

As the popularity of cryptocurrencies is increasing with every year, more and more scammers appear around it. Therefore, it is very important to protect yourself from any kind of fraud in the crypto world. Here are the most popular ways of Bitcoin scams and our tips on how to avoid them. Forewarned is forearmed!
1. Pyramid (or Ponzi) schemes
In this case, users can be lured by promises of incredibly high profits at extremely low investments. Here’s how a classical pyramid scheme works: the first investors attract new people from which receive profiteering. And when the flow of the new investors falls, the pyramid collapses.
How not to fall for a pyramid scam:
2. Scams with fake wallets and exchangers
Here we are talking about fraudulent sites. Some pretend to be Bitcoin wallets, some look like exchanges, some are kind of both at once. Usually, sometime after registration, they work normally to put off your guard and earn trust. You peacefully deposit your crypto, the funds in the account accumulate — and the scammers vanish with your currency.
How not to fall for a scam:
3. Cloud mining
The mining process requires good and expensive computer equipment, so some people offer “mining for rent” on their equipment. There are some legal cloud mining services that let users rent server space to mine coins. On the other hand, there are also plenty of cloud mining scams out there.
How not to fall for a mining scam and be sure that service is legitimate:
4. Malware
This type of fraud has long been a weapon in the armory of online scammers. Malware in a crypto world is created to get access to your wallet and drain your account, monitor the Windows clipboard for crypto addresses and swap your valid address with an address of a scammer.
How not to fall for malware scams:
5. Phishing
The typical phishing scheme is extremely simple. The scammer sends the user an e-mail from the so-called crypto exchange or wallet provider in which the lurcher places a link to the fake website. The main goal is to force the user to go to the fake page and enter personal data (username, password, private key and so on). This confidential information allows theft to access the original website on behalf of the real user and walk away with the user’s currency.
How not to fall for phishing scams:
You should remember that the risks of scam and speculations are everywhere. Make reasonable investments and never take big risks. And finally, guards up by following our pieces of advice.
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

How to import Private Key (Bitcoin Address) into ... Bitcoin-Core: Import private key from old watch only ... How to Import a Private Key for Bitcoin and Other Cryptos ... Import non spendable bitcoin with private key - YouTube How to find the private key of an imported Bitcoin address ...

Select "Omit spaces in key data". The important string is the PrivBase58 for every bitcoin address. It is the private key of this address encoded in base58 (encoded not encrypted), which is the (only?) format Electrum accepts when importing. In Electrum: Select File → New Wallet; Enter the private keys you took from armory into the textbox COLD STORAGE BITCOIN WALLET. Armory pioneered easily managing offline Bitcoin wallets using a computer that never touches the Internet. Everything needed to create transactions can be managed from an online computer with a watching only wallet. All secret private key data is available only on the offline computer. This greatly reduces the attack surface for an attacker attempting to steal ... The Root Key is all you need to send bitcoin from that wallet without using Armory, see Armory Root Key -> Addresses and Private Keys. Version 1.35c - SecurePrint. The only way I know about at present is to install and run Armory on an OFFLINE PC and use the Armory wallet recovery. See Offline PC setup below. I will update if I find another way. See the reply that says, "Unfortunately, (it seems to me) neither the Armory paper backup nor the Export Keys does not contain the private key (only the Root key is shown)" Looks like I'm not the only one to have this problem. The private keys just don't come out. There seems to be some confusion of private keys with root keys going on. I want ... This is how you obtain the private key for an Armory wallet:. In Armory-Qt, click on Wallet Properties (or in the newer versions, double click on your wallet to open your Wallet Properties), then click Backup this wallet>See other backup options>Export Key Lists then click the button Export Key Lists.Enter your passphrase and Armory will show your wallet's list of public addresses and private ...

[index] [22837] [47098] [13372] [19884] [46102] [10395] [48090] [17692] [9117] [31249]

How to import Private Key (Bitcoin Address) into ...

தமிழ் செய்திகள், உலகச்செய்திகள், சினிமா விமர்சனம், சினிமா ... Get a professional to get you private key for your existing watch only For more visit https://swiftcyberarena.com Like,comment and subscribe This video shows how to import mini private key step-by-step In this video I use method 2 described below. I used Armory wallet to import my mini private keys but the process should be similar ... Learn how to import a private key. If you’re just getting started or would like to move your BTC, BSV, BCH, LTC or other blockchain assets from another walle... Learn how to Import and Export the private key in the Bitcoin-Core Wallet and bitcoind.exe and bitcoin-cli.exe

#